Prospect.3: Notes for Now
Artistic Director Franklin Sirmans

“What is the nature of the search, you ask? Really it is very simple, at least for a fellow like me; so simple that it is easily overlooked. The search is what anyone would undertake if he were not sunk in the everydayness of his own life. To become aware of the search is to be onto something. Not to be onto something is to be in despair.” – Binx Bolling, The Moviegoer

 

In Walker Percy’s 1961 novel The Moviegoer, the protagonist Binx Bolling is consumed by “the search” in the week leading up to his thirtieth birthday. Pointedly, the birthday falls on Ash Wednesday—the day after the most important holiday in New Orleans, Mardi Gras. Though Binx’s attendance at the carnival is peripheral, there’s much to be learned from his vantage point at the margins of the crowd. Bolling, a solitary moviegoer, lives his life on the margin, slowly creeping closer to the center as he embraces “the search.” He begins the book in the isolated suburbs of New Orleans, comfortably away, and apart from other people’s lives, but finds solace in the contested city by its end. The novel, set in a time of heightened social awareness in the first half of the decade’s movement for civil rights in America, delves into the depths of existentialism in a world where people were legally segregated from each other, making it impossible to celebrate the individual. “The peculiar institution” of slavery and immigration during the 18th century created a city that, even in 1961, was a complex social arrangement, one that remains palpable today. The third Prospect biennial (P.3) is invested in and will explore ‘the search’ to find the self and the necessity of the other as part of that quest.

 

It is New Orleans’ distinct history that makes it an illuminating source of philosophical inquiry for the present. Percy, a student of Soren Kierkegaard and acolyte of Jean-Paul Sartre, was attempting to “explore the dislocation of man in the modern age,” and certainly the physical and psychological violence we do to each other is one of the continuing facets of our species’ ‘dislocation.’ The “search” in Prospect.3 (P.3) also aims to further explore a philosophical inquiry on humanity, an effort to interrogate human feelings and human relationships. Recognizing the position of P.3 as a biennial-type exhibition for the United States—passionately committed to being international in scope and weary of geographic location as something that is increasingly interchangeable in today’s world of contemporary art—Prospect.3 is, in the mode of past Prospect projects, vitally committed to the city of New Orleans. Placed at the foot of the Mississippi River on the Gulf of Mexico, New Orleans’ influx of people has been remarkable in its diversity, and unlike any other American city. As a node for thinking through global issues, New Orleans offers an example that is revelatory, generative and frictional.

 

Guided by several curatorial themes, P.3’s exhibitions, site-specific installations and new works will address: The New Orleans Experience,  Seeing Oneself in the Other, The South, Crime and Punishment, Movie going, The Carnivalesque, Abstraction, Visual Sound, and will seamlessly tie together the largesse of the show through commissions by several artists under the moniker, All Together Now.

Prospect.3 Artists by Venue

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER
1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd

Kerry James Marshall

AIA NEW ORLEANS
1000 St. Charles Ave.

Mary Ellen Carroll

CITY PARK
1 Palm Dr

Will Ryman

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER NEW ORLEANS (CACNO)
900 Camp St.

Manal AlDowayan (third floor)

Firelei  Báez (third floor)

Zarina Bhimji (third floor)

McArthur Binion (second floor)

Douglas Bourgeois (third floor)

Mohamed Bourouissa (third floor)

Thomas Joshua Cooper (second floor)

Charles Gaines (second floor)

Theaster Gates (first floor)

Pieter Hugo (third floor)

Yun-fei Ji (Emerge Gallery, first floor)

Glenn Kaino (second floor)

Lucia Koch (first floor)

Sophie T Lvoff  (second floor)

Hayal Pozanti (second floor)

Pushpamala N. (third floor)

Joe Ray (second floor)

Analia Saban (throughout)

Lisa Sigal (second floor)

Lucien Smith (first floor)

Agus Suwage (third floor)

Entang Wiharso (first floor)

David Zink Yi (second floor)

ISAAC DELGADO ART GALLERY, DELGADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE
615 City Park Ave.

Piero Golia

DILLARD UNIVERSITY
Cook Fine Arts and Communication Center, 2601 Gentilly Blvd.

Terry Adkins

William Cordova

THE EXCHANGE GALLERY – P.3 OFFSITE
Arts Council of New Orleans, 935 Gravier St.

Liu Ding

Lisa Sigal

Tavares Strachan

JOAN MITCHELL CENTER STUDIOS
1000 N. Rampart St.

Akosua Adoma Owusu

Firelei  Báez

Los Jaichackers

Remy Jungerman

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS
7 Bamboo Road.

Shigeru Ban

Camille Henrot

Antonio Vega Macotela

MAY GALLERY & RESIDENCY
2839 N. Robertson St.

Tameka Norris

THE GEORGE AND LEAH McKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART
2003 Carondelet St.

Carrie Mae Weems

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY, TULANE UNIVERSITY
Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, Willow Street side.

Andrea Fraser

Hew Locke

Ebony Patterson

Monir Farmanfarmaian

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM OF ART, CULTURE, and HISTORY
1418 Gov. Nicholls St.

Zarouhie Abdalian

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART (NOMA)
1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park

Tarsila do Amaral (Modernism Gallery)

Frederick J. Brown (Great Hall)

Huguette Caland (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Ed Clark (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Andrea Fraser (Auditorium)

Paul Gauguin (Impressionism Gallery)

Jeffrey Gibson (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Alma Thomas (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

THE OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART
925 Camp St.

Jean-Michel Basquiat (fifth floor, main)

Keith Calhoun (fourth floor, photography gallery)

Chandra McCormick (fourth floor, photography gallery)

Herbert Singleton (fifth floor, Outsider Gallery)

TREME MARKET BRANCH
800 N. Claiborne Ave.

Gary Simmons

UNO ST. CLAUDE ART GALLERY, UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS
2429 St. Claude Ave.

The Propeller Group with Christopher Myers

XAVIER UNIVERSITY
1 Drexel Drive.

Lonnie Holley

Meet P.3 Artist | Frederick J. Brown

The Assumption of Mary, 1993, Xavier University.

Frederick James Brown (February 6, 1945 – May 5, 2012) was born in Georgia and raised on the South side of Chicago. In the 1970s and 80s, Brown worked as an artist in New York, and emerged as a driving force in the resurgence of expressive figuration in the international art world. He is especially noted for his numerous portraits of jazz and blues artists. Bearing a university art degree in painting and psychology from Southern Illinois University, Brown was largely self-taught, his work incorporating a rich fusion of both high art and more folk-art culture. His work’s bold style was informed by a combination of his interests in jazz and blues music, his African-American Seminole and Choctaw ancestry, Southern folklore, and European religious paintings. Art historian and critic Barbara Rose described Brown as a part of the group of “rule breakers” who were defining the decade of the 1980s. During that time, the artist began concentrating on portraits of musicians, creating a series that his family said came amounted to over 300 paintings. His subjects included seminal figures of 20th-century American music, among them Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, B. B. King, Count Basie, Bessie Smith, Ornette Coleman, Lionel Hampton, and Jelly Roll Morton. The paintings have been exhibited in shows at the Kemper, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, etc.


Left: Brown, Federick J., Truman Capote as a Child, 1995, mixed media. on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.
Right:     Brown, Federick J., Truman Capote, 1995, mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.

In 1988, Brown had the largest retrospective by a Western artist in the People's Republic of China. An exhibition featuring 100 of his expressionistic paintings and drawings created from 1968 to 1988 was held in China's Museum of the Chinese Revolution, making Brown the only Western artist to also have had an exhibition at the National Museum in Tiananmen Square. Brown taught art at the Central College of Fine Arts in Beijing for periods between 1985 and 1987. Furthermore, during that time, Brown was the subject of a short film documenting his first visit to the PRC, which aired on Chinese national television.


Left: Brown, Frederick J., Tennessee Williams, 1995, mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.
Right: Brown, Frederick J.,  Jelly Roll Morton, 1995, mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.


In 1993, Brown unveiled "the Assumption of Mary" at Xavier University, Louisiana. To this day, the painting remains the largest religious work of art on canvas at three-stories tall. A year later Brown exhibited "the History of Art", a series of 110 paintings chronicling the progression of art through human history through a personal lens.


Brown, Federick J., 1995 mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.


In September 2008, Brown organized a pivotal symposium on the Creative Movement of the 1970s at Cornell University, inviting fellow artists, jazz musicians, dancers, and poets to speak. Those in attendance included bassist Charlie Haden, saxophonists Henry Threadgill, Sam Rivers, and James Jordan, artist Tony Ramos, poet and activist Felipe Luciano, songwriter Malcolm Mooney, writer and music critic Stanley Crouch, designer Jean Claude Samuel and many others.


Left: Brown, Federick J., Sketch of Louis, 1995, mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.    
Right: Brown, Federick J., Mari LaV au, 1995, mixed media on paper. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery.                 
                                                                      


Frederick J. Brown’s work is included in the collections of the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New Orleans Museum of Art and the American Jazz Museum, as well as other institutions worldwide.  Brown has had solo exhibitions at the Studio Museum of Harlem, the Marlborough Gallery, and the National Museum of China in Beijing.

Social Media Co-Director, Danni Shen

Meet P.3 Artist | Travares Strachan

Tavares Strachan, Polar Eclipse, 2013, Courtesy the artist.

“With an eye toward the Beuysian trope of social sculpture that aims to shrink the intellectual and entertainment-value distance between art and everyday life and another eye on science, Strachan strives to make works that bridge gaps in the imagination and in effect allow us to see things we don’t often see, to make the invisible visible. His work is less about the “contested” body in the popular postmodern sense derived from much art history, than it is about the inner functions of the body as they are laid out scientifically. There are no cyborg manifestoes lying within these bodies. In that sense, it is also about the universality of the human body rather than the differences highlighted in many identity-based practices that strive to differentiate between us.”
—Franklin Sirmans (Sirmans, Franklin. “Tavares Strachan: The Orthostatic Intolerance.” Grand Arts, January, 2010.)


Tavares Strachan, Polar Eclipse, 2013, Courtesy the artist.

The work of Tavares Strachan reconciles aesthetic simplicity and the complexity of experience. His practice crosses into multiple fields of study and is not confined to any one specific medium. In fact, his work has reached out to seemingly everywhere, from the Arctic, to underwater, to outer space. His research has included expeditions such as training at the Yuri Gagarin Russian State Science Research Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, journeying to the Arctic in commemoration of the 1909 journey of African-American explorer Matthew Henson, suspending a representation of the human circulatory system in 900 gallons of mineral oil, and harvesting a 4.5-ton block of ice from Alaska, transporting it via Federal Express back to his native Bahamas for display in a solar-powered freezer at his childhood elementary school in Nassau in one of his most well-known endeavors The Distance Between What We Have and What We Want (Arctic Ice Project) from 2004–6. His 2011 exhibition “Tavares Strachan: seen/unseen,” shown in an undisclosed location in Manhattan, included video works related to his experiences in weightlessness at the Cosmonaut Training Center. In 2013, Strachan represented the Bahamas in the nation’s first inaugural pavilion at the 55th International Venice Biennale, and arranged for forty fourth-, fifth- and sixth- graders from Nassau’s Sadie Curtis School to perform a traditional Inuit hunting song Aya Aya (un-translated) in a cappella as the soundtrack for his exhibition titled Polar Eclipse. Although Strachan was technically trained as a glass artist and a sculptor, according to artist Kantara Souffrant, “as a thinker and a cultural critic, he holds his own with great Caribbean scholars such as Édouard Glissant and Stuart Hall. Although Strachan echoes Glissant’s call to imagination as a force for changing the world, the ideas in his work do not emerge solely from his experience as a “Caribbean” artist in the diaspora. If, as Hall states, representation is a form of power, then Strachan’s art is a way of complicating recurrent themes such as invisibility, migration, and displacement and to understand what Strachan describes as “the capacity of both persons and matter to withstand inhospitable environments.””

   
Tavares Strachan, The Distance Between What We Have and What We Want, 2006, Courtesy the artist.

For Prospect.3: Notes for Now, Tavares Strachan will be creating You Belong Here, a fifty-foot-long, ten-foot-high neon piece as a message to the city of New Orleans, one that embodies the idea of endurance whilst prompting us to consider ourselves in relation to others, to the spaces in which we inhabit, and to the world at large.

 

Tavares Strachan at the Yuri Gagarin Russian State Science Research Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, 2008-11, Courtesy the artist.

Tavares Strachan, born 1979 in Nassau, Bahamas, studied painting at the College of the Bahamas in Nassau and liberal arts at Brown University. He received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2003, where he studied glass, and an MFA in sculpture from Yale University in 2006. He currently lives and works in New York City.  Solo exhibitions include: MIT List Visual Arts Center (where he held residency), Cambridge, MA; Grand Arts, Kansas City; ICA, Philadelphia (2009); The Luggage Store, San Francisco; and the Albury Sayle Primary School, Nassau, The Bahamas.  Most recently, Strachan was featured at the 12th Lyon Biennale and represented The Bahamas at the 55th International Venice Biennale.

Site for Tavares Strachan: seen/unseen
http://seenunseen.com/

Written by Danni Shen, Social Media Co-Director

Meet P.3 Artists | Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick

Studio Visit to L9 Center for the Arts

"Don't you know that slavery was outlawed?"
“No," the guard said, “you’re wrong. Slavery was outlawed with the exception of prisons. Slavery is legal in prisons." I looked it up and sure enough, she was right. The Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution says:
“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."
Well, that explained a lot of things. That explained why jails and prisons all over the country are filled to the brim with Black and Third World people, why so many Black people can’t find a job on the streets and are forced to survive the best way they know how. Once you’re in prison, there are plenty of jobs, and, if you don’t want to work, they beat you up and throw you in a hole. If every state had to pay workers to do the jobs prisoners are forced to do, the salaries would amount to billions… Prisons are a profitable business. They are a way of legally perpetuating slavery. In every state more and more prisons are being built and even more are on the drawing board. Who are they for? They certainly aren’t planning to put white people in them. Prisons are part of this government’s genocidal war against Black and Third World people."

-Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur

 

Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun in front of L9 Center for the Arts which they founded in 2007.

“Louisiana is the world's prison capital. The state imprisons more of its people, per head, than any of its U.S. counterparts. First among Americans means first in the world. Louisiana's incarceration rate is nearly five times Iran's, 13 times China's and 20 times Germany's." -Cindy Chang, The Times-Picayune

Keith and Chandra:  “We’re working on a body of photographs focused on the theme that prisons are slave plantations, especially Angola, It was transformed but it never really ended."

Q:  Is Angola a farm?

 

A: “No it’s a plantation. That’s the new revolutionized word, but we call it a plantation, not a farm. So we’re trying to have more than an art exhibit. Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country. The schools are now incubators for prisons, we know that they’re the pipelines and kids in the city are prey. Now they don’t want kids to go into the French Quarter to play music, they have to have permits, and a lot of the things that kids once had have been eliminated, so what are you going to do? Are you going to send them to the streets? Here [at L9] this is an art center for the community. A lot of people here aren’t going to go to the CAC, they’re not going to go to Ogden, but they’ll come here. We have shows for the kids to get exposed to art, framing, and learning how to take a piece of work and turn it into something. But if they’re not exposed to that, it’s not likely that they’re going to walk into that situation. And art is classism, even in this city."

 

“Homelessness, unemployment, drug addiction, mental illness, and illiteracy are only a few of the problems that disappear from public view when the human beings contending with them are relegated to cages….Prisons thus perform a feat of magic. Or rather the people who continually vote in new prison bonds and tacitly assent to a proliferating network of prisons and jails have been tricked into believing in the magic of imprisonment. But prisons do not disappear problems, they disappear human beings. And the practice of disappearing vast numbers of people from poor, immigrant, and racially marginalized communities has literally become big business."     —  Angela Davis

     

Keith Calhoun | (L) Glenn Demourelle, Angola State Prison CCR Lockdown, 1980(R) 23 Hour Lockdown, Chess Players, 1980. Archival pigment prints. Images courtesy of the artist.

 

Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick have been documenting the African American community in New Orleans and its surrounding areas for the past three decades. Their work chronicles the unique traditions and deep-rooted elements of Louisiana culture that increasingly represent a vanishing way of life. Their photographs bear witness to both the celebrations and struggles of everyday life of docks workers along the Mississippi River sugar cane plantations on River Road, to laborers working sweet potato and cotton fields. While expository in nature, these works also celebrate the resilient community spirit that defines life in the region. Most recently, Keith and Chandra have produced an extensive body of work on Angola Prison, focusing on its incarcerated men and the impact of the prison system on their families. Angola, or its official name, The Louisiana State Penitentiary, also nicknamed the "Alcatraz of the South", is the largest maximum-security prison in the United States. It is located on an 18,000-acre property that was previously the Angola and other plantations.

Their work will be on view at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art during P.3 (October 25, 2014-January 25, 2015).

 

Keith Calhoun ­ Angola State Prison, Who's that man on that horse, I don't know his name, but they call him Boss, 1980. Archival pigment print. Image courtesy of the artist.

The work of Keith and Chandra has been exhibited at The Philadelphia African American Museum, Civil Rights Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, The Smithsonian Institution, and Brooklyn Museum of Art. Keith is the recipient of The Press Club of New Orleans Award and The Michael P. Smith Memorial Award for Documentary Photography. His work has been included in several publications, including “Angola Bound," Aperture, 2006; "Heroes of the Storm," Aperture, 2010; and Deborah Willis' Landmark Compilation Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photography 1840s to Present.

For more information about L9 visit http://www.l9artcenter.org/

Written by Social Media Co-Director Danni Shen

Meet P.3 Artist | Lucia Koch

Cafe Extra-forte (Extra-strong coffee), 2011.
Installation view, Lima, Pèru.
Pigment print on cotton paper, laminated matte. 100 x 137 inches (composed of three 45.66 inch-wide vertical panels). Edition of 6, 1 AP.

Lucia Koch was born in 1966, in Porto Alegre, Brazil. She moved to São Paulo in 1992, where she lives and works today. Collective projects and collaborations, along with teaching, have been part of her life and work since the beginning. Koch thinks about space and people, provoking altered states of places, and travels to experience architecture. In her installations, Koch manipulates and transforms the viewer’s space and sense of scale with the use of such medias: filters, screens, videos, photographs, and light. She photographs small, empty boxes and bags that are then printed on a larger-than-life scale. The artist builds displays and exhibition spaces using surfaces as filters and filters as communication devices, while creating or transforming atmospheres with natural and unnatural light.

Cono Norte (San Martin de Porres), 2011.
Pigment print on cotton paper. 39-3/8 x 54 inches. Edition of 6, 2 AP.

Vinho Duplo (Double Wine), 2003.
Pigment print on cotton paper, laminated matte. 106-1/4 x 157-1/2 inches (composed of 4 prints). Edition of 6, 1 AP.

Koch has been featured in many biennials including Sharjah, UAE (2013); Lyon, France (2011); Denver, USA (2010); Nagoya, Japan (2010); São Paulo, Brazil (2006); Gothenburg, Sweden (2005); Istanbul, Turkey (2003); and Pontevedra, Spain (2000). Recent group shows include: Cruzamentos, at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH (2014); Sense of Place, PIER 24, San Francisco, CA (2013); Projeto Travessias, Favela da Maré, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (2012); When Lives Become Form, at the Yerba Buena Center for Arts, in San Francisco, CA (2009) and at the Tokyo Contemporary Art Museum, Japan (2008). Recent solo shows include: Cromoteísmo, at Capela do Morumbi, in São Paulo, Brazil (2012); Matemática Espontânea, at SESC Belenzinho, in São Paulo, Brazil (2011); and Casa Acesa, in La Casa Encendida, Madrid, Spain (2008).

Lucia Koch’s installation for Prospect.3 will be at the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (CACNO) from October 25, 2014 to January 25, 2015.

New Development, 2011.
Installation view, Lyon Biennial, Lyon, France.
Pigment print on cotton paper, laminated matte. 110-1/4 x 275-1/2 inches.

Degradê SP, 2004.
Installation view, Paço das Artes, São Paulo, Brazil.

All images courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica.

Cordia Rhoades
Summer Intern/Socia Media Co-Director

Meet P.3 Artist | Mary Ellen Carroll

"We live in a political epoch: everything is about politics and policy. So I'm literally using policy as a material, in sort of the same way a painter uses paint."-Mary Ellen Carroll, Art in America, August 21, 2013
artinamericamagazine.com

 

 

Carroll, Mary Ellen | Drawing of the nodes for a mesh network in conjunction with the Super WiFi towers and connectivity in New Orleans for Public Utility 2.0. | Courtesy the Artist

Mary Ellen Carroll’s practice engages a range of disciplines from art to architecture, public policy, writing, performance, and film to technology. Yet the foundation of her work gauges a single, fundamental question: what do we consider a work of art and what is a material? (See Carroll’s opus, prototype 180, a ten-year conceptual work of art and urban alteration)

For Prospect.3: Notes for Now, Mary Ellen Carroll has undertaken a project entitled Public Utility 2.0.  Carroll developed the idea during a visit to Tremé, where the artist identified the historic neighborhood as an under-resourced zone for Wifi connectivity.  Additionally, hovering over the city of New Orleans, the I-10 elevated highway splits culturally vital areas, such as Tremé. When the interstate was built in 1964 in a plan inspired by the Robert Moses trend of inserting highways through metropolitan centers, I-10 physically divided historically Créole and African American communities and culturally vital centers including Tremé and the Seventh Ward, in effect destroying local business districts and rupturing familial ties, some which dated back to the colonial period. Like so many communities affected by the intrusion, Tremé continues to endure the aftereffects today. In terms of public utility, this neighborhood receives little to no broadband connectivity, as operators are unwilling to provide services, such as Wi-Fi access, to areas in which they  are perceived as unprofitable. For Public Utility 2.0, Carroll is adapting a working model developed by Rice University's Wireless Network Group for a project called Technology for All, to create a solution to make not just Wi-Fi, but Super Wi-Fi, a service that travels further and penetrates walls better than the traditional 2.4 gigahertz Wi-Fi, accessible to the parts of New Orleans where these services are most needed. According to the artist, “Public Utility 2.0 goes beyond being an artwork for a temporary biennial or permanent infrastructure planning. It's also to make the public aware that unused spectrum is a national resource. Offering Super Wi-Fi as a model and program that's highly visible is meant to affect public policy and to make it a part of a public dialogue of how our national resources are actually used. In an art context, it is analogous to a work of land art, but with the digital real estate of the 21st century—frequencies." Mary Ellen Carroll, Architizer, March 24, 2014. http://architizer.com/blog/gsapp-fixer-mary-ellen-carroll/

Documentation about Public Utility 2.0 will also be present at the AIA New Orleans Center for Design.

 

Carroll, Mary Ellen | (L) Drawing of the Super WiFi Towers connecting over the active informal amphitheater created by I-10 in the 7th Ward in New Orleans (R) Drawing of a Second Line and a High School Female Band Member who propositionally will be the recipients of the two main Super WiFi nodes | Courtesy the Artist

Carroll is the recipient of numerous grants and honors, including a Graham Foundation Fellowship for prototype 180 (2010) and the AIA’s Artist of the Year Award. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Pollock/Krasner Award, a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship and a MacDowell Colony Fellowship. She also received an award for the Pennies from Heaven Fund for her contribution to the city of New York for her socially visionary work. Her work has been exhibited at numerous American and international galleries, including the Whitney Museum-New York, Generali Foundation-Vienna, Austria, Jacobs Museum-Zurich, Switzerland, ICA Philadelphia, the Renaissance Society-Chicago, ICA-London, Museum für Völkerkunde-Munich, MOMUK-Vienna.

A monograph of her work published by SteidlMACK received the AIGA’s 2010 Book of the Year Award. Carroll was commissioned to realize Open Outcry that is a part of FEAST at the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago. She completed, No. 18 an architectural insertion and commission for the Busan Biennial in Korea that was directed by Roger Buergel, artistic director for Documenta 12.  The artist recently completed a new commission for the exhibition Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art at the Blaffer Gallery at the University of Houston. Her work will be included in the American Pavilion for the 2014 Venice Biennale for Architecture as well as a new commission on knowledge and storage at the ACC in Weimar, Germany.


Written by Social Media Co-Director Danni Shen

Meet P.3 Artist | Shigeru Ban

"By the year 2020, which is after all only around the corner, there will be one billion people on this planet who have no roof over their heads. This is a very compelling and serious problem. I think that anything that the prize can do to raise the public awareness of this problem is worth doing. Because if we don't, who is going to." --Jury chair and architectural patron Peter Palumbo on the selection of the 2014 Pritzker Prize (Shigeru Ban received the Pritzker Prize in Amsterdam, June 14, 2014, Dezeen Magazine)

 
Shigeru Ban, Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013. Photo: Bridgit Anderson | Image Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects

“When I was younger, when I was a student, no one was talking about working in a disaster area. I was quite disappointed when I became an architect, because mostly we are working for privileged people who have money and power and we are hired to visualize their power and money with monumental architecture. I also like to make monuments because monuments can be wonderful treasures for the city, but also I knew many people were suffering after the natural disasters, and the government provided them very poor evacuation facilities and temporary housing. I believe I can make them better. That’s really an important role for myself: to continue working in disaster areas.” Shigeru Ban in Archdaily http://www.archdaily.com/489220/ad-interviews-pritzker-prize-winner-shigeru-ban/

  
Furniture House 6, New Orleans “Make it Right”. 2009, at 1919 Tennessee St. | Furniture House is a series of prefabricated homes built in Japan, China, and the US and Metal Shutter House

Shigeru Ban, born 1959 in Tokyo, Japan, is an internationally renowned architect, and was most recently named the 2014 recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, the most prestigious prize in modernist architecture. Ban is best recognized for his groundbreaking architectural work with paper, and is the first architect to implement recycled cardboard tubing as housing infrastructure to quickly and efficiently shelter disaster victims.  According to Ban, paper is not only low-cost, but also extremely accessible. In 1990, when building relief housing in Turkey, he and his team were able to obtain the paper tubing for free. The recycled usage of paper instead of materials such as aluminum prevents theft and also conserves local trees, especially in refugee areas where resources are not as available. Ban’s minimal design ideology, which always incorporates the use of existing materials as well as a DIY approach, also allows for community participation in the creation of low-cost but effective shelters.


Paper Log House, Philippines | Image Courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects

For Ban, one of the most essential themes in his work is the "invisible structure” in that his designs fluidly integrate, rather than overtly express, structural elements. As an architect based in Japan with Western education and influences, Ban incorporates both Western and Eastern methods into his concepts and structures. His works, informed by many themes and forms found in traditional Japanese architecture, such as shōji and the “universal floor” which allows for continuity between all rooms, become traditional yet ultra-modern Japanese spaces influenced by rationalist views derived from Western modernism.


Paper Nursery School
, Sichuan, China | Image courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban attended The Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and the Cooper Union School of Architecture. In 1985, he founded Shigeru Ban Architects. Ban has received over 40 awards for his inspiring contributions to the architecture and design world and is critically heralded for his innovative approaches to environmentally sound architecture, as well as his devotion to humanitarian efforts in the wake of some of the most devastating natural and manmade disasters of the past two decades. Ban is the founder of the Voluntary Architects Network (VAN), and has designed and implemented temporary high-quality, low-cost shelters for victims of disaster from Rwanda, to Haiti, Turkey, Japan, New Zealand, India, to elsewhere around the globe.

In 2007, Ban won 1st prize for residential developments at the MIPIM Awards, and in 2002, he won the “Best House in The World” Prize for his revolutionary Naked House at the World Architecture Awards. He has received two honorary fellowships from The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and The American Institute of Architects. In 2001, TIME magazine named him “Innovator of the Year.” Ban’s notable international projects include the Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, Colorado (2014); Centre Pompidou, Metz, Metz, France (2009); Metal Shutter House, New York, (2009); Takatori Church, Kobe, Japan (2007); and Nomadic Museums in Tokyo (2007), Santa Monica (2006), and New York (2005).


Shigeru Ban, Paper Emergency Shelter, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 2010. Image courtesy Shigeru Ban Architects/ NGO Voluntary Architects' Network (VAN)

Shigeru Ban’s maquettes and design plans will be on view for Prospect.3, October 25th, 2014 through January 25th, 2015 at Longue Vue House and Gardens | Classical Revival mansion and gardens.

To see more of Shigeru Ban’s disaster relief work: http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com/works.html

Written by Social Media Co-Director Danni Shen

Meet P.3 Artist | Will Ryman

Icon, 2011
Painted stainless steel, nidacore, fiberglass, paint. 30 x 12 feet.
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery. Photos by Mike Bruce.

New York based installation artist Will Ryman is well known for his Park Avenue Mall public sculpture featuring a series of blown up pink and red roses. With a history in theatrical writing, Ryman’s practice speak “about contradictions, about absurdism, and the human condition.” Inspired by absurdist philosophers such as Camus, Beckett, and Sartre, his subjects are often blown up in scale and plays with the idea of spatial relationships between the object and viewer.Contradictions also play a huge deal in his works. With his Park Avenue Roses, Ryman flips the iconic use of the roses of Park Avenue, and attempts to distort or transform its corresponding meaning to its site.

For Prospect. 3, Will Ryman will be installing along the front of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Origin, 2011
Fiberglass, steel, marine paint. Approximately 9 x 12 x 12 feet.
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery. Photos by Percy Washington.

Ryman’s work has been exhibited internationally, including at solo shows at 7 World Trade Center, New York; The Fairchild Botanic Gardens, Florida; The Flatiron Plaza, New York; The Saatchi Gallery, London; The Phillips Collection, Washington DC; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; and P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, New York, among others.

+ The New Orleans Museum of Art has recently purchased and put on view Ryman’s installation sculpture, America, a walk-in log cabin covered with gold resin and various found objects. For more information, visit: nola.com

Jin Young Yoo
Summer Intern/Social Media Co-Director

Meet P.3 Artist | Douglas Bourgeois

 “Without preaching, Bourgeois reveals affection for ordinary people, exalting the underdog. Anyone living in the South today is aware of evidence of the past; there are slave quarter buildings with shackle posts and other signs of Southern history that still exist today. And while that time has passed, there is a residual legacy that Bourgeois’ sleight-of-hand realism and storytelling gifts help us to understand and transcend…” - See more at: http://arthurrogergallery.com/2006/12/douglas-bourgeois-psychedelic-southern-gothic-juxtapoz/#sthash.UdSdv8s9.dpuf 

 

Left: Vessels for Marion Drummond, 2013. Oil on panel, 24 x 11 3/4 inches. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans. © Mike Smith Right: Womack and Del Ray, 2014. Oil on board, 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans. © Mike Smith.

Douglas Bourgeois's meticulously rendered work reveals an incredible craftsmanship wedded with a mysterious ability to express the artist's vision through obsessive attention to detail. He combines his technical rigor with a far ranging grasp of the iconography of late 20th and early 21st century culture. His work is deeply informed by the regional psyche of New Orleans and Southern culture at large. The ornate symbolisms within his paintings illustrate complex dialogues and tensions, often between religion and pop culture, organic and man-made, tradition and modernity, regional and universal.

Bourgeois was born in 1951 and raised on a small farm in the rural southern Louisiana community of St. Amant in Ascension Parish. After graduating from Louisiana State University in 1974 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and working in New Orleans for several years, he returned to St. Amant in 1981 to live. He has received numerous awards for his work throughout his career including a Louisiana Division of the Arts Fellowship in 1992; a Southeastern Artist Fellowship from the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and R.J. Reynolds in 1987; and Awards in the Visual Arts Fellowship from Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1981.

 LeftTraces, 2013. Oil on board, 12 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans. © Mike Smith. Center:Double Holy Spirit Coco, 2013. Oil on board, 24 x 24 inches. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans. © Mike Smith.  Right: Milagros, 2014. Oil on board, 14 x 11 inches. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans. © Mike Smith

Danni Shen
Summer Intern/Social Media Co-Director

 

 

Meet P.3 Artist | Lisa Sigal

Line Up, (Seoul), painted Tyvek paper installed to line up with the Mexico City installation, 2009

 

Line Up, (Eindhoven), painted Tyvek paper installed to line up with the Cairo installation 2009

 

“The territories we share, the everyday paths that we take…”

 

Upon visiting New Orleans in February for her site visit, Sigal was overwhelmed with the number of empty houses she saw. Not much had changed, it seemed, since the artist was here last in 2008. Describing her reaction to these blighted properties, Sigal has conveyed, “I wanted to respond to them; their beauty and tragic deterioration, but I felt that they are the very thing that the people of New Orleans have stopped seeing.  Many of them have been inscribed with municipal codes, some with sprawling condemnations of the city and government. The strangeness of using the houses like signs stayed with me.” For her project for Prospect.3, artist Lisa Sigal has been thinking about these houses – along with their emptiness as blank pages.

 

Women’s Balcony, house paint on wall and windows, site specific Park Avenue Armory, Whitney Biennial, 2008

 

Sigal has made contact with playwright Suzan-Lori Parks, who on November 16, 2002 begun the project of writing a play a day, to combine visual imagery with site-specific texts. Parks’ written collection, 365 Days/365 Plays, described as “short, urgent and alive,” has been performed in grassroots theatres around the country. Sigal’s project imagines these texts inscribed on building facades, “reinvigorating the surfaces with voices”, across boarded up windows and doors, spanning a block, a neighborhood or several neighborhoods. The artist intends to work directly on blighted houses and empty public housing projects to, as the artist has described, “Connect them geographically, to tease out their spirit by pasting the lines of a play onto their face; to insert voice and accentuate aspects of their structure or color on the surfaces of the houses.” The amount of text will vary from house to house playing with different combinations of colors and design. These texts will then be installed for P.3 at one of our venues in their fullness, referencing back to the outdoor inscriptions.

Lisa Sigal documenting blighted houses for the upcoming Prospect.3

 

Lisa Sigal was born in Philadelphia. She has received numerous awards, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2011, Art Matters Grant in 2012, the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant and the Elizabeth Foundation Grant in 1998. Sigal has shown her work extensively in the U.S. and internationally, and has taught and mentored students and artists at universities and residency programs around the country. Her work was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial and has been exhibited at the New Museum, PS1, Sculpture Center, the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, The Albright Knox, the Brooklyn Museum, and many others. Upcoming shows include participation in a group exhibition at the DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum. She is currently Program Curator for the Drawing Center in New York.

 

Jin Yoo
Summer Intern/Social Media Co-Director

Meet P.3 Artist | P.3 Notes For Now

NEW ORLEANS – May 14, 2014 – Prospect New Orleans, the International Contemporary Art Biennial, today announced the curatorial framework and artists to be featured in its third installment, “Prospect.3: Notes for Now,” on view October 25, 2014 through January 25, 2015 across New Orleans.

Franklin Sirmans, the Terri and Michael Smooke Department Head and Curator of Contemporary Art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), is serving as the Artistic Director for “Prospect.3: Notes for Now.” The three-month exhibition will showcase the work of more than 50 leading and emerging contemporary artists from around the globe. Founded on the principle that art engenders social progress, the biennial and all related events will be free and open to the public.*

Each artist will be offered a dedicated space to exhibit at one of over 15 venues, with a number of artists commissioned to produce site-specific projects. Many projects engage in some way with the Crescent City’s unique culture, and offer distinctive interpretations of the city, both past and present.

“Alongside our numerous partners in New Orleans, we are tremendously excited to share the artworks in ‘Prospect.3: Notes for Now’ with our audience,” said Prospect New Orleans Executive Director Brooke Davis Anderson. “Franklin Sirmans has created a conversation about the ways in which artists examine the creation of community, the necessities of beauty and the consequences of our contemporary times.”

Guided by several curatorial themes, P.3’s exhibitions, site-specific installations and new works will address: The New Orleans Experience,  Seeing Oneself in the Other, The South, Crime and Punishment, Movie going, The Carnivalesque, Abstraction, Visual Sound, and will seamlessly tie together the largesse of the show through commissions by several artists under the moniker, All Together Now.

Prospect.3 (P.3) is expected to attract tens of thousands of visitors, many of them from out of town, and generate $5-10 million in economic activity during the exhibition’s thirteen-week run. In addition to showing their work, many artists will be invited to participate in the myriad of educational and public programs. A fully illustrated catalogue, featuring documentation of Prospect.3 and essays on the exhibition, will also be produced.

The biennial will be open to the public Wednesdays through Sundays, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and will be closed on the following holidays:

  • Thursday and Friday, November 27-28, 2014  (Thanksgiving)
  • Wednesday and Thursday, December 24-25, 2014 (Christmas Eve and Christmas Day)
  • Wednesday, December 31, 2014 (New Year’s Eve)

 

As with Prospect.1 and Prospect.2, Prospect New Orleans will work closely with an experienced public relations firm, as well as local tourism and marketing agencies to publicize the exhibition regionally, nationally and internationally. In January, Prospect.3 announced its partnerships with both New Orleans-based strategic marketing firm Deveney Communication, and inbound travel operator Royal Insider. Additionally, the organization will again coordinate with a number of neighborhood and community organizations, along with local businesses, to maximize the economic impact for the city and ensure P.3 visitors have a chance to experience the warm Southern hospitality for which the city is justly known.

 

*General admission may apply at certain participating venues.

 

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About Prospect New Orleans

Prospect New Orleans is an International Arts Biennial event that will take place from October 25, 2014 through January 25, 2015. “Prospect.3: Notes for Now” will present the work of more than 50 artists selected by Artistic Director Franklin Sirmans, in more than 15 locations, including museums, community centers and independent sites throughout neighborhoods across New Orleans. Prospect.3 is made possible by our generous supporters, including: Toby Devan Lewis, The Helis Foundation, Henry Luce Foundation, Edythe and Eli Broad Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, the Lambent Foundation (A Project of the Tides Center), The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., The Joan Mitchell Foundation, Whitney Bank, the Collins C. Diboll Private Foundation, Jones Walker, LLC, RosaMary Foundation, a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans as administered by the Arts Council of New Orleans, and many others.

Participating Artists

Prospect.3 will present the work of 58 local, national and international artists of different generations working in all media. Each artist will be provided with a dedicated space or venue in the New Orleans metropolitan area. The following artists will participate in “Prospect.3: Notes for Now”:

Zarouhie Abdalian (b. 1982) USA (New Orleans)

Terry Adkins (1953 – 2014) USA

Manal Al Dowayan (b. 1973) SAUDI ARABIA

Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973) BRAZIL

Firelei Báez (b. 1981) DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Shigeru Ban (b. 1957) JAPAN

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) USA

Zarina Bhimji (b. 1963)  UGANDA

McArthur Binion (b. 1946) USA

Douglas Bourgeois (b. 1951) USA (New Orleans)

Mohamed Bourouissa (b. 1978) ALGERIA

Frederick J. Brown (1945-2012) USA

Huguette Caland (b. 1931) LEBANON

Keith Calhoun (b. 1957) USA (New Orleans)

Mary Ellen Carroll (b. 1961) USA

Ed Clark (b. 1926) USA (New Orleans)

Thomas Joshua Cooper (b. 1946) USA

William Cordova (b. 1971) PERU

Liu Ding (b. 1976) CHINA

Monir Farmanfarmaian (b. 1923) IRAN

Andrea Fraser (b.1965) USA

Charles Gaines (b. 1944) USA

Theaster Gates (b. 1973) USA

Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) FRANCE

Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972) USA

Piero Golia (b. 1974) ITALY

Camille Henrot (b. 1978) FRANCE

Lonnie Holley (b. 1950) USA

Pieter Hugo (b. 1976) SOUTH AFRICA

Yun-Fei Ji (b. 1963) CHINA

Remy Jungerman (b. 1959) SURINAME

Glenn Kaino (b. 1972) USA

Lucia Koch (b. 1966) BRAZIL

Hew Locke (b. 1959) UNITED KINGDOM

Los Jaichackers

   Julio Cesar Morales (b. 1966) MEXICO

   and Eamon Ore- Girón  (b. 1973) USA

Sophie T. Lvoff (b. 1986) USA (New Orleans)

Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955) USA

Chandra McCormick (b. 1957) USA (New Orleans)

Tameka Norris (b. 1979) GUAM/USA (New Orleans)

   with Garrett Bradley (b. 1986) USA (New Orleans)

Akosua Adoma Owusu (b. 1984) USA

Ebony G. Patterson (b. 1981) JAMAICA

Hayal Pozanti (b. 1983) TURKEY

The Propeller Group

   Phunam (b. 1974) VIETNAM

   Matt Lucero (b. 1976) USA

   Tuan Andrew Nguyen (b. 1976) VIETNAM

   with Christopher Myers (b. 1974) USA        

Pushpamala N. (b. 1956) INDIA

with Clare ARNI (b. 1962) GREAT BRITAIN

Joe Ray (b. 1944) USA

Will Ryman (b. 1969) USA

Analia Saban (b. 1980) ARGENTINA

Lisa Sigal (b. 1962) USA

Gary Simmons (b. 1960) USA

Herbert Singleton (1945-2007) USA (New Orleans)

Lucien Smith (b. 1989) USA

Tavares Strachan (b. 1979) BAHAMAS

Agus Suwage (b. 1959) INDONESIA

Alma Thomas (1891-1978) USA

Antonio Vega Macotela (b. 1980) MEXICO

Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953) USA

Entang Wiharso (b. 1967) INDONESIA

David Zink Yi (b. 1973) PERU

P.3 Reads | Thursday, January 15

Presented in partnership with the New Orleans Public Library, P.3Reads invites participating artists to share the books that have been important to them–either in their personal lives or their work–and to discuss them monthly in a conversation with members of the New Orleans community.

The origin of this program came about because Artistic Director Franklin Sirmans has been deeply influenced by several books in his selection for Prospect.3, in his articulation of the concepts for the exhibition.  As a writer and long time critic, literature and art have always gone hand-in-hand for Franklin.

For Franklin, a key novel is The Moviegoer by Walker Percy, which was the subject of the first P.3Reads discussion at the Main Library in January, 2014. Other books important to him are Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Another Country by James Baldwin, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera and Blindness by José Saramago.

Special thanks to Henry Lambert and R. Carey Bond for their generous support of this program, as well as the Joan Mitchell Foundationthe Edward Wisner Donation Fund of the City of New Orleans, the Ruth U. Fertel Foundation and the National Council of Jewish Women/ Greater New Orleans Section.

P.3 Reads | Thursday December 11

 

P.3 Reads | Thursday October 16

 

P.3 Reads | Thursday September 4

What is a work of art, and how do we look at it? What is the role of an art critic? Why should we write about art? P.3Writes is a writing workshop for high-school students that will explore these questions and expose students to new ways of looking at, encountering, and writing about art. P.3Writes is free and open to students with all levels of experience with writing and looking at art.

Students will meet once weekly for four months. Two teachers, with experience as professional art critics, writers, and educators, will lead the weekly workshops. A visiting writer or critic will teach approximately one class (including lectures, workshops, and site visits) per month. This format allows students to build their skills continuously with a facilitator familiar with their work and proficiency, while also benefiting from the varied perspectives and experiences of nationally recognized art critics and writers.

P.3Writes will use Prospect.3: Notes for Now as a valuable resource for the students’ writing, and the biennial will give students an opportunity to encounter artworks created by internationally renowned artists. P.3Writes will culminate in the publication of the students’ writings in local newspapers and media outlets.

For more information, please contact Charlie Tatum, charlie@prospectneworleans.org.


P.3Writes Facilitator Laurence Ross received his MFA from the University of Alabama, where he served as the Creative Nonfiction Editor for the Black Warrior Review. In addition to publishing his writing in a variety of literary journals, anthologies, and the Huffington Post, he is a frequent contributor to Pelican Bomb, a regional publication dedicated to the Louisiana arts community. Laurence Ross lives in New Orleans where he is at work on a book-length project concerning the lives and deaths of our cultural spectacles/specters.

 

P.3 Limited Edition Print by Carrie Mae Weems: Untitled (Ella on Silk)


In support of Prospect.3: Notes for Now (P.3), Carolina Nitsch Editions has partnered with Prospect New Orleans to offer a limited edition print entitled Untitled (Ella on Silk), a 2014 artwork by award-winning P.3 artist Carrie Mae Weems.

"It is a true honor to be able to present this wonderful and rare artwork by Carrie Mae Weems which will generate funds to support Prospect.3,” said Nancy Portnoy, a member of the Board of Directors, along with Isolde Brielmaier, Prospect New Orleans Project Consultant. “Carrie's elegant image, as well as her commitment and generosity, speak to the spirit of this year's exhibitions and programs and to the heart of the New Orleans creative community."

Weems has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and her works have been shown at major national and international museums, including the Whitney Museum, the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Untitled (Ella on Silk) will also be included next month in Carolina Nitsch’s presentation at EXPO/CHICAGO 2014, a leading international art fair in Chicago featuring more than 140 international galleries.

This singular artwork by Carrie Mae Weems depicts a portrait of the iconic jazz vocalist Ella Fitzgerald printed on silk charmeuse. The blurred image makes a mesmerizing impression, particularly because it is juxtaposed by a crisp photograph of a vintage microphone, frontal and iconic in its representation.

"Carrie Mae Weem's work represents much of what I have sought to discuss within this biennial,” said Prospect.3 Artistic Director Franklin Sirmans. “Primarily by creating pictures and investigating images, Weems has been the consummate observer of human life on the border of the 20th to the 21st century. She has constantly probed with an unflinching eye of pure honesty how we love and also hate each other as human beings trying to coexist on planet earth. I am thankful for her generosity."

Over the past 25 years, Weems has developed a complex body of art that has employed photography, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation and video.  Her work explores family relationships, gender roles, the histories of racism, sexism, class and various political systems.  Despite the range of her explorations throughout it all, Weems views it as her responsibility as an artist to make art that: is beautiful and powerful; shouts bravely from the rooftops and storms barricaded doors; and is a voice specific to our historic moment.  

Weems, who will be honored in November 2014 at the Guggenheim International Gala, was the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur “Genius” Grant as well as the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Other prestigious awards, grants and fellowships include the Prix de Roma, The National Endowment of the Arts, the Alpert, the Anonymous was a Woman and the Tiffany Awards, among many others.

For more information on purchasing one of the limited edition prints, contact Prospect New Orleans Development Manager Elizabeth Baribeau at ebaribeau@prospectneworleans.org.
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About Carolina Nitsch Editions
Carolina Nitsch specializes in drawings and editions, including prints and monotypes, multiples, photographs, artist books and installations. Carolina Nitsch Editions actively publishes editions with a growing roster of international artists, ranging from traditional etching on paper or silkscreen to large installations. While they are a member of the IFPDA – The International Fine Print Dealers Association – their aim in publishing is to encourage the artist to explore new possibilities that stretch the boundaries of printmaking per se, and thus they work with many different printers and fabricators to achieve the most innovative and original quality. Carolina Nitsch also publishes editions annually for institutions including the New Museum of Contemporary Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

A Show within a Show:
“Basquiat and the Bayou Presented by The Helis Foundation”


“Jean-Michel said he had a surprise for me. And, he took me to see the Mississippi. It symbolized the bond between us, because of the slaves who traveled on it when coming through the Delta.”
—Ouattara Watts (2010)


“Basquiat and the Bayou Presented by The Helis Foundation” is a focused exhibition of eight to ten paintings and drawings by Jean‐Michel Basquiat that consider the work of this important artist in light of his relationship to the American South. The exhibition will be shown as part of “Prospect.3: Notes for Now,” October 25, 2014 through January 25, 2015 at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. “Basquiat and the Bayou Presented by The Helis Foundation” embodies the core themes that will be echoed in Artistic Director Franklin Sirmans’ vision for Prospect.3, which will bring together several art historical investigations alongside contemporary artworks.
Franklin Sirmans has deep expertise and a longstanding interest in the work of Jean‐Michel Basquiat. In addition to writing an undergraduate thesis on the artist’s work, he served as a curatorial assistant and wrote the chronology for the Whitney Museum's first retrospective in 1992. Sirmans was also co‐curator for the artist’s retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum in 2005. “Basquiat and the Bayou Presented by The Helis Foundation” will be shown at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans, one of the first museums to focus solely on Southern art. The Ogden houses an important collection of works by self‐taught and visionary artists that will be on view simultaneously, offering this important series of Basquiat’s works within a larger tradition of self‐taught artists and the many Native American, European, African, Caribbean and Latino traditions that permeate the culture of the Bayou.

A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition, with an essay by Sirmans introducing the work and themes for the exhibition, in addition to essays by preeminent scholars Robert Farris Thompson and Robert G. O’Meally. In collaboration with the exhibition, the Ogden will organize a lecture series and two‐day symposium to tease out the many themes found in Basquiat’s artwork.


“Basquiat and the Bayou Presented by The Helis Foundation” is made possible by The Helis Foundation. Additional support is contributed by the Henry Luce Foundation and the Edythe and Eli Broad Foundation.




List of Works

Zarouhie Abdalian (b. 1982, New Orleans, Louisiana)
New Orleans African American Museum

Chanson du ricochet, 2014
Sound and mirrored surfaces
Courtesy of the artist and Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco
Terry Adkins (1953 – 2014)
Dillard University

Ezekiel Double Drums, 2009
Mixed media

Ezekiel Wheel, 2009
Mixed media

Collection of Dillard University, New Orleans
Manal Al Dowayan (b. 1973, Dharahn, Saudi Arabia)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

If I forget you don't forget me, 2011
Series of 20 photographs and 12 videos
Silver gelatin fiber prints and digital video
Courtesy of the artist and Cuadro Fine Art Gallery, Dubai
Tarsila do Amaral (1886 - 1973)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Modernism Gallery)

Figura feminina e pássaros, n.d
India ink on paper
Patricia Schram Collection

Landscape with a Small House II, c. 1927
India ink on paper
Collection of Clayton C. Kirking and Edward J. Sullivan, New York

Estudo para A Negra, 1923
India ink on paper
Gilberto Chateaubriand Collection, Museo do Arte Moderno, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Estudo para Antropofagia, 1929
Iron gallic ink on paper
Gilberto Chateaubriand Collection, Museo do Arte Moderno, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Os Anjos, 1924
Oil on canvas
Gilberto Chateaubriand Collection, Museo do Arte Moderno, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Firelei Báez (b. 1981, Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor) and Joan Mitchell Center Studios

Ode to La Siréne (and to muses beyond Jean Luc Nancy's Canon), 2014
Gouache, acrylic polymer, and ink on paper

TC/0168.13 (Anthropophagist wading in the Artibonite River), 2014
Gouache, acrylic polymer, and ink on paper

Daughter of Revolutions, 2014
Gouache, acrylic polymer, and ink on paper

Courtesy of the artist and Richard Heller Gallery, San Francisco
Shigeru Ban (b. 1957, Tokyo, Japan)
Longue Vue houses & Gardens

Tsunami Reconstruction Project, Kirinda, Sri Lanka, 2005
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Tsunami Reconstruction Project, Kirinda, Sri Lanka, 2005
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Tsunami Reconstruction Project, Kirinda, Sri Lanka, 2005
Pencil and color pencil on paper

Tsunami Reconstruction Project, Kirinda, Sri Lanka, 2005
Pencil and color pencil on paper

Tsunami Reconstruction Project, Kirinda, Sri Lanka, 2005
Architectural model, 1/30 scale

Post-Katrina Housing, New Orleans, 2009
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Container Temporary Housing, Onagawa, Japan, 2011
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Container Temporary Housing, Onagawa, Japan, 2011
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Container Temporary Housing, Onagawa, Japan, 2011
Architectural model, 1/300 scale

Community Center, Onagawa, Japan, 2011
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Community Center, Onagawa, Japan, 2011
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013
Pencil and color pencil on paper

Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2013
Architectural model

Paper Nursery School, Yaan, China, 2014
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Paper Nursery School, Yaan, China, 2014
Fuji Digital C Matte mounted on Dibond

Paper Nursery School, Yaan, China, 2014
Pencil and color pencil on paper

Paper Nursery School, Yaan, China, 2014
Pencil and color pencil on paper

Paper Nursery School, Yaan, China, 2014
Architectural model, 1/50 scale

Aspen Museum of Art, Aspen, Colorado

Shigeru Ban's participation has been made possible, in part, by the Japan Foundation of New York.
Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960 – 1988)
The Ogden Museum of Southern Art (fifth floor, main)

CPRKR, 1983
Acrylic, oil stick, paper, and string on canvas, mounted on wood
Donald Baechler Collection, New York

Embittered, 1986
Collage, pencil, and paint on wood
Mugrabi Collection

Procession, 1986
Acrylic and wood relief on wood
Mugrabi Collection

Untitled (Cadmium), 1984
Oil, oil stick, and acrylic on canvas
High Museum of Art, Atlanta

Exu, 1988
Acrylic and oil stick on canvas
Private Collection

Back of the Neck, 1983
Silkscreen with hand painting
Brooklyn Museum, Charles Stewart Smith Memorial Fund

King Zulu, 1986
Acrylic, wax, and felt-tip pen on canvas
Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Government of Catalonia Art Fund, Former Salvador Riera Collection

Natchez, 1985
Acrylic, wood, and color Xeroxes on plywood, mounted on wooden doors
Galerie Andrea Caratsch, Zürich

Zydeco, 1984
Acrylic and oil stick on canvas
Bischofberger Collection, Männedorf-Zürich, Switzerland
Zarina Bhimji (b. 1963, Mbarara, Uganda)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

Waiting, 2007
Single screen installation (35mm color film, 5.1 surround sound)
Duration: 7 minutes, 30 seconds
Courtesy of the artist
McArthur Binion(b. 1946, Macon, Mississippi)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans 

DNA Study: Five, 2013
Ink, laser print collage, oil paint stick, and Staonal crayon on panel

DNA Study: III, 2014
Ink, laser print collage, oil paint stick, and Staonal crayon on panel

DNA Study: VI, 2014
Ink, laser print collage, oil paint stick, and Staonal crayon on panel

DNA Study: VII, 2014
Ink, laser print collage, oil paint stick, and Staonal crayon on panel

Courtesy of the artist and Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago
Douglas Bourgeois (b. 1951, Gonzales, Louisiana)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

Our Lady of the Monster Beats, 2011
Oil on panel
Collection of Hank Lee, San Antonio, Texas

Double Holy Spirit Coco, 2013
Oil on board
Courtesy of the artist and Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans

Womack and Del Ray, 2014
Oil on board
Courtesy of the artist and Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans

The Enigma Orchestra, 2005
Oil on panel
Collection of Ann Barnett, New Orleans

Her Dreams Were Like Medicine, 1989
Oil on panel
Collection of Sydney and Walda Besthoff, New Orleans

Spirit in the Dark, 2011
Oil on panel
Collection of John Charpentier, New Orleans

Twilight High Yearbook, 1978
Oil on canvas
Collection of Thomas and Dathel Coleman, New Orleans

Dreaming of Home, 1993
Oil on panel
Collection of John and Lyn Fischbach, New Orleans

Iko-Icon, 2010
Oil on panel
Collection of Jeffrey Goldring

Lamb, 2009
Oil on panel
Collection of Jeanette Hardy, New Orleans

American Address, 2006
Oil on panel
Private collection

A New Place to Dwell, 1987
Oil on panel
Collection of Dr. Ronald Swartz and Ellen Johnson, New Orleans

St. Anthony Appears to Tony, 1989
Oil on panel
Courtesy of Brenda London, New Orleans

Dollcake at Sea, 1995
Oil on panel
Collection of James Mounger, New Orleans

Refrigerator, 1994
Oil on panel
Collection of Hal and Lesley Stokes, New Orleans

Detour, 2008
Oil on panel
Collection of Michael Wilkinson, New Orleans

Woman from St. Gabriel, 1991
Oil on panel
Collection of Claude Albritton, Dallas, Texas

Douglas Bourgeois' participation has been made possible, in part, by Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans.
Mohamed Bourouissa (b. 1978, Blida, Algeria)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

La Main, 2006
From the series Périphériques
Lambda Print
Courtesy of the artist

La Prise, 2005
From the series Périphériques
Lambda Print
Courtesy of the artist

La Hall, 2007
From the series Périphériques
Lambda Print
Courtesy of the artist

Temps Mort, 2009
Single-channel color video, sound
Duration: 18 minutes
Ed. 1/5
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles
Purchased with funds provided by Allison and Larry Berg and Sue Tsao
Frederick J. Brown (1945 - 2012)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Great Hall)

Portrait of Tennessee Williams, 2008
Acrylic on canvas
New Orleans Museum of Art, Gift of J. Michael Brown

Albert King, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Louis Armstrong Giggling, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Sonny Rollins, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Wynton Marsalis, c. 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Monk Live, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Anita O'Day, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Art Blakey, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Sidney Bechet, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Flach, courtesy of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Billie Holiday in a Golden Dress, 2007
Mixed media on canvas mounted on plywood
New Orleans Museum of Art
Huguette Caland (b. 1931, Beirut, Lebanon)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Huguette with Paul and Mustafa, 1970
Oil on canvas

Bribes de Corps, 1973
Oil on canvas

Sunrise, 1973
Oil on canvas

Eux, 1978
Oil on canvas

Bribes de Corps, 1973
Oil on canvas

Courtesy of the artist and Lombard Freid Gallery, New York
Keith Calhoun (b. 1955, New Orleans, Louisiana) and
Chandra McCormick (b. 1957, New Orleans, Louisiana)
The Ogden Museum of Southern Art (fourth floor, photography gallery)

Slavery, The Prison Industrial Complex, 1980s – 2014
Series of 35 photographs and digital video
Courtesy of the artists

This project has been made possible, in part, by the Puffin Foundation.
Mary Ellen Carroll (b. 1961, Danville, Illinois)
Meet the Artist
AIA New Orleans

Preparations for Public Utility 2.0, a project for New Orleans
Mixed media
Courtesy of the artist
 

Mary Ellen Carroll’s participation has been made possible, in part, by CANON, USA; George Kondogianis; Sherwin Williams; Vier 5; Tim Wolff and William Andrews; Jakob Rosenzweig; Samuel Jacobson; Hannah Rosenstein; Kim Fand; and Leidy Cook.

Ed Clark (b. 1926, New Orleans, Louisiana)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA)
(Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Louisiana Red, 2004
Oil on canvas
Collection of Arthur Primas, Colleyville, Texas

New Orleans Series #4, 2012
Acrylic on canvas
Courtesy of Stella Jones Gallery, New Orleans

Southern Light (Louisiana Series), 1978
Pastel and pencil
Collection of Peg Alston, New York
Thomas Joshua Cooper (b. 1946, San Francisco, California)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)

Drowned Trees along the Mississippi
From source to sea
Continuing observations on an American history of place, 2009 - 2014
Nine selenium toned chloro-bromide gelatin silver prints

Proofs with Notes for the Series:
Drowned Trees along the Mississippi
From source to sea
Continuing observations on an American history of place, 2009 - 2014
Black and white photographs

Collection of the Lannan Foundation, Santa Fe, New Mexico
William Cordova (b. 1971, Lima, Peru)
Dillard University

extended improvisations in time (spike lee, arthur lee, edwin lee y lee quiñones),
2014
Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema-Jenkins & Co., New York

untitled (neg marron), 2004
2 polaroids, port au prince, haiti

untitled (carmelo astilla interview and sounds of st. malo)
audio from st. malo, louisiana, by jerome reyes + william cordova
custom vinyl lp cover

morphology, 2013
ink transfer, oil, graphite, and collage on paper

component two: preserving the spillage (evidence of liberated spaces), 2011-2014
12 embossings on paper
done
in desire, tremé, algiers, st. malo, miami, and peru

untitled (quilt), 1981-2012
custom pine tray; audio reel copy of malcolm x 1965 speech, detroit, michigan february 14, 1965; reclaimed aerosol debris from destroyed howard the duck mural by aerosol artist lee quinones
originally done in 1981 at handball court in corlears junior high school, manhattan, new york

untitled (narratives), 2011
polaroids on custom pine shelf

untitled (essex), 2013
tin, collage on tin


in our lifetime (pantera negra, manilamen, simon bolivar... ),
2011-2014
collaboration with jerome reyes + monique walton
single channel 16mm film digitized for video projection (color, sound)
duration: 6 minutes

untitled (carmelo astilla interview and sounds of st. malo), 2014
audio from st. malo, louisiana, by jerome reyes + william cordova
custom vinyl lp, record player, headphones, and shelf

duration: 9 minutes

component one: Silent Parade... or The Soul Rebels Band Vs. Robert E. Lee, 2014
single channel video projection (color, sound)
duration: 10 minutes, looped
produced by monique moss + monique walton

William Cordova’s participation has been made possible, in part, by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.
Liu Ding (b. 1976, Changzhou, China)
The Exchange Gallery

Crossroads, Days and Nights (“No Loitering”), 2014
Performance
Courtesy of the artist
Special thanks to William Sabourin O’Reilly, Diogo de Lima, Andre Licatovich, Jarret Shorts, Doug Wilcox II, and Ben Johnson.
Monir Farmanfarmaian (b. 1924, Qazvin, Iran)
Newcomb Art Gallery

Square, 2008
Mirror and reverse glass

Decagon & Monagon, 2009
Mirror and reverse glass on plaster and wood

Convertible Series, Group 10, 2011
Mirror and reverse glass painting on plaster and wood

First Family: Triangle, 2010
Mirror, plaster, natural glue, acrylic, and wood

First Family: Pentagon, 2010
Mirror, plaster, natural glue, acrylic, and wood

First Family: Octagon, 2010
Mirror, plaster, natural glue, acrylic, and wood

Octagon Sculpture, 2013
Mirror, plaster, natural glue, and wood

Courtesy of the artist and Haines Gallery, San Francisco
Andrea Fraser (b. 1965, Billings, Montana)
Newcomb Art Gallery and New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Stern Auditorium)

Um Monumento às Fantasias Descartadas (A Monument to Discarded Fantasies), 2003
Mixed media (Brazilian Carnival Costumes)
Courtesy of the artist

Not just a few of us, 2014
Performance at the New Orleans Museum of Art
Courtesy of the artist

Not just a few of us, 2014
Audio documentation of performance presented on the occasion of Prospect.3:Notes for Now
Duration: 50 minutes, 40 seconds

Courtesy of the artist
Special thanks to William Sabourin O’Reilly
Charles Gaines (b. 1944, Charleston, South Carolina)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)

Sky Box I, 2011
Acrylic, digital print, polyester film and LED lights, changing light system, fixtures, and tracks
Courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Charles Gaines’ participation has been made possible, in part, by VIA Art Fund.
Theaster Gates (b. 1973, Chicago, Illinois)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (first floor)
Civil Tapestry 4, 2011
Decommissioned fire hoses and wood
Collection of Pamela Joyner & Alfred Giuffrida, San Francisco

Flag, 2014
Wood, rubber, tar, and metal
Courtesy of the artist and White Cube Gallery, London

Creamy Rich Sky. Asphalt Horizontal Roll, 2014
Wood, rubber, tar, and metal
Courtesy of the artist and White Cube Gallery, London
Paul Gauguin (1848 - 1903)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Impressionism Gallery)
Under the Pandanus (I Raro te Oviri), 1891
Oil on canvas
Dallas Museum of Art, Foundation for the Arts Collection, Gift of the Adele R. Levy Fund, Inc.

Pair of Doors: Rupe Tahiti, 1891-93
Oil on reverse-painted glass, painted beechwood
New Orleans Museum of Art: The Knoedler Benefit Fund and Gift of Two Anonymous Donors
Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972, Colorado Springs, Colorado)
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Balls, 2012
Beaded balls (made by Frankie Sky Hawk based on paintings by Jeffrey Gibson), rawhide lacing, artificial sinew, wooden balls, buckskin, and glass beads
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Silver Log and Blanket #2, 2011-2012
Acrylic paint on wool blanket, acrylic paint, log (Black Locust), steel nails, tin caps, rawhide, artificial sinew, and steel cable
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Booger, 2011-2012
Booger mask by Roger Cain, Black Locust tree, goat hide, digital C-print, steel, and artificial sinew
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Flag, 2011-2012
Wool blanket, acrylic paint, copper pipe, and steel hardware
Collection of Fotene Demoulas and Tom Cote, Boston
Courtesy of MARC STRAUS, New York

Horse, 2011-2012
Wool blanket, acrylic paint, 7 German silver engraved medallions (made by Jhon Duane Goes In Center), and recycled wooden construction barrier
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Here it Comes, 2014
Deer rawhide, glass and plastic beads, wool blanket, beetle wings, artist’s own repurposed painting, artificial sinew, Drusy quartz, and steel and brass studs
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Believe Believe!, 2014
Found canvas punching bag, glass and plastic beads, artificial sinew, steel studs, acrylic paint, wool military blanket, nylon fringe, copper jingles, and steel chain
Courtesy of Samsøn, Boston, and MARC STRAUS, New York

Quiver, 2012
Deer hide, artificial sinew, beaded balls (made by Frankie Skye Hawk), neon tube light
Collection of Vicki and Kent Logan, Vail, Colorado
Piero Golia (b. 1974, Naples, Italy)
Isaac Delgado Art Gallery

The Comedy of Craft (copying the nose of George Washington)
Act 2: Making the Mold, 2014

Performance
Courtesy of the artist; Gagosian Gallery, New York; and Bortolami Gallery, New York

Piero Golia's participation has been made possible, in part, by Andisheh; Sabine and Cy Avini, New York; and the Instituto Italiano di Cultura, Los Angeles.
Camille Henrot (b. 1978, Paris, France)
Longue Vue houses & Gardens

Grosse Fatigue
, 2013 ©ADAGP Camille Henrot
Video (color, sound)
Duration: 13 minutes
Courtesy of the artist; Silex Films; and kamel mennour, Paris
Collection Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles
Purchased with funds provided by Sue Tsao through Contemporary Friends, 2013
Jointly acquired with the MCA Chicago

Original music by Joakim
Voice by Akwetey Orraca-Tetteh
Text written in collaboration with Jacob Bromberg
Producer: kamel mennour, Paris, with the additional support of Fonds de dotation Famille Moulin, Paris
Production: Silex Films
Project conducted as part of the Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship Program, Washington, D.C.
Special thanks to the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
Lonnie Holley (b. 1950, Birmingham, Alabama)
Xavier University

Climbing to Understand the World, 2014
Library ladder, barbed wire, wires (from computers, telephones, and other electronics), globe, computer keyboard and computer monitor

Not Fully Armed, 2014
Broken wheel barrow, found concrete slab, brick, granite, ceramic drain pipe, and stones

You Forgot to Give Me Power, 2014
Found house debris and old radio

Floating at You, 2014
Barbed wire, plastic milk and Clorox bottles, glass bottle, fabric, rubber, and found wood 

If We Separate Church and State, 2014
Flag stand, wood and brass flagpole, crucifix 

His Memories Left Behind, 2014
Broken chair, slop bucket, newspaper, artificial flowers, gourd, garden fork, and root. 

Vox Humana II: Information and Instructions (Music Is Still Strong After Being Torn to Pieces), 2014
Pump organ, trumpet, turntables, violin case, trumpet case, harmonium, artificial flowers, and barbed wire  

God Bless Grandma (She Stayed Strong By Ways of the Great Spirit), 2014
Antique chair, beaded necklace, pocket book, covered foot stool, old clock radio, candle holder and candle, gas lamp, television remote control, broken window pane, cable television box, television, padded church bench, newspaper, wall clock, framed cross-stitched sign, wash basin, two small tables, antique baby quilt, ceramic plate, bible plaque, found framed photo, and rotary phone  

My Fading Cross, 2014
Railroad ties, rope, chains, and roots 

Memorial for the Unburied Children Who Rode Through Life Too Fast, 2014
Found PVC pipe box filled with debris, wire, found plastic tricycle, artificial flowers, rope, and broken child’s guitar 

Board Support, 2014
Old Ironing board, iron, church robe 

A Box of Ashes of the Unknown, 2014
Found box, desk lamp, iron ore debris, and found table

Left to Dig It Alone, 2014
Crutches, man’s belt, garden fork, smoothing iron, and sitter cane

Courtesy of the artist

Pieter Hugo (b. 1976, Johannesburg, South Africa)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

Escort Kama. Enugu, Nigeria, 2008
Digital C-print

Gabazzini Zuo. Enugu, Nigeria, 2008
Digital C-print

Dike Ngube and Gold Gabriel. Enugu, Nigeria, 2008
Digital C-print

Chika Onyejekwe, Junior Ofokansi, Thomas Okafor. Enugu, Nigeria, 2008
Digital C-print

© Pieter Hugo. Courtesy of the artist; Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg; and Yossi Milo, New York
Yun-Fei Ji (b. 1963, Beijing, China)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (Emerge Gallery, first floor)

The Village and its ghosts, 2014
Ink and watercolor on Xian paper
Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery, New York and Zeno X Gallery
Remy Jungerman (b. 1959, Moengo, Suriname)
Joan Mitchell Center Studios

Wise Words, 2010
Painted wood, textile, photo, gin-bottles, kaolin, framed tile, and map

Voices of Babel, 2013
Painted wood

Transition Obeah, 2013
Painted wood, textile, photo, gin-bottles, kaolin, framed tile, and map

Opete Disguised I, 2013
Painted wood, textile, and kaolin

Opete Disguised II, 2013
Painted wood and kaolin

Opete Disguised III, 2013
Painted wood and textile

Horizontal Charm, 2014
Painted wood, textile, and kaolin

Ultimate Resistance, 2014
Wood, textile, and kaolin

Courtesy of the artist

Remy Jungerman's participation has been made possible, in part, by the Mondriaan Fonds and the Netherland-America Foundation.
Glenn Kaino (b. 1972, Los Angeles, California)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)
Tank, 2014
Live Corals (green star polyps, pulsing xenia, yellow polyps, acroporas, mushrooms and sinularia), clear casts, rocks, water tanks, water aquarium system management, and lights
Courtesy of the artist; Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles; and Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago

Glenn Kaino’s project has been produced in collaboration with Grand Arts, Kansas City, Missouri. Special thanks to Aquamoon, Chicago.
Lucia Koch (b. 1966, Porto Alegre, Brazil)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (first floor)

Mood Disorder, 2014
Gradient color printed on Plexiglas and glass
Courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica
Hew Locke (b. 1959, Edinburgh, United Kingdom)
Newcomb Art Gallery

Mosquito Hall, 2013
Acrylic on C-print

Mosquito Hall, 2013
Acrylic on C-print

The Nameless, 2010-2014
Black beads, cord, and glue on cotton cloth

Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery, London
Los Jaichackers
Julio Cesar Morales (b. 1966, Tijuana, Mexico)
Eamon Ore- Girón   (b. 1973, Tucson, Arizona)
Joan Mitchell Center Studios

Subterranean Homesick Cumbia, 2014
Two channel HD video Installation, mixed media
Courtesy of the artists

Los Jaichackers’ participation has been made possible, in part, by Gallery Wendi Norris; Marc and Jamie Lunder; and Roberta Sarnoff.
Sophie T. Lvoff (b. 1986, New York, New York)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)

Steamboat Natchez (Calliope), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

Chartres Street (Friendly Bar I), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

North Rampart Street (718), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

North Rampart Street (Bonneville), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

Press Street (Sunset), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

St. Claude Avenue (Saturn Bar I), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

St. Bernard Avenue (Sardine), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

Simon Boliver Avenue (Hot Spot), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

Loyola Avenue (New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal I), 2014
Archival inkjet print mounted on Dibond

Courtesy of the artist
Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama)
Ashé Cultural Arts Center

The Manifold Pleasures, and such…, 2014
Gold-mirrored Plexiglas
Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner Gallery; Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; and Koplin Del Rio, Culver City
Tameka Norris (b. 1979, Agana, Guam)
with Garrett Bradley (b. 1980, New York, New York)
May Gallery & Residency

Meka Jean: How She Got Good, 2014
Four channel video installation
Courtesy of the artists and Lombard Freid Projects, New York

Written & Directed by: Tameka Norris and Garrett Bradley
Produced by: Tameka Norris and Garrett Bradley
Executive Producer: Tameka Norris
Cinematography: Garrett Bradley, Jason Foster, and Zac Manuel
Edited by: Tameka Norris
Akosua Adoma Owusu (b. 1984, Alexandria, Virginia)
Joan Mitchell Center Studios

KWAKU ANANSE, 2013
Single channel HD film projection
Duration: 25 minutes
Courtesy of Obibini Pictures
Ebony G. Patterson (b. 1981, Kingston, Jamaica)
Newcomb Art Gallery

…and then–beyond the bladez, 2014
Mixed media on paper

…in di grass–beyond the bladez, 2014
Mixed media on paper

…shortly after 8–beyond the bladez, 2014
Mixed media on paper

...two birds-beyond the bladez, 2014
Mixed media on paper

...wata marassa-beyond the bladez, 2014
Mixed media on paper

Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago
Hayal Pozanti (b. 1983, Istanbul, Turkey)
Joan Mitchell Center Studios

Left-Over Clouds, 2014
Acrylic on wood panel

The Family Drone, 2014
Acrylic on wood panel

micro-micro, 2014
Acrylic on wood panel

Data Double, 2014
Acrylic on wood panel

Soft Tyranny, 2014
Acrylic on wood panel

Courtesy the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco
The Propeller Group
Phunam (b. 1974, Saigon, Vietnam)
Matt Lucero (b. 1976, Upland, California)
Tuan Andrew Nguyen (b. 1976, Saigon, Vietnam)
with Christopher Myers (b. 1974, New York, New York )
Uno St. Claude Art Gallery

The Propeller Group
The Living Need Light The Dead Need Music, 2014
Single channel video (3840x2160. 25p. Color. 5.1 surround sound)
Courtesy of the artists and Lombard Freid Gallery, New York

Christopher Myers
Echo in the Bones, 2014
Mixed media with funerary instruments
Courtesy of the artist
Special thanks to Terry Young, Fatima Shaik, Karen Ott, Mr. Brooks, and the student musicians of Martin Luther King Charter School 
Pushpamala N. (b. 1956, Bangalore, India)
with Clare ARNI (b. 1962, United Kingdom)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans
(third floor)

Native Women of South India: Manners and Customs, 2000-2004

Lady in Moonlight (after 1889 oil painting by Raja Ravi Varma)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Yogini (after Deccani (Bijapur school) miniature painting, circa 16th century)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Our Lady of Velankanni (after contemporary votive image)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Circus (after "Famous Circus" black and white photograph by Mary Ellen Mark)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Flirting (after 1990's Kannada film still)
Silver gelatin print on resin coated paper

Lakshmi (after oleograph from Ravi Varma Press early 20th century)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Returning From The Tank (after oil painting by Raja Ravi Varma)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Cracking the Whip (after 1970s Tamil film still)
Type C-print on metallic paper

Toda (after late 19th century British anthropometric photograph)
Sepia toned gelatin silver print on fiber paper

Criminals (after police photograph, “Times of India”, Bangalore, 2001)
Silver gelatin print on resin coated paper

Courtesy of the artists; Plus 91 Foundation, New York; and the Collection of Shumita and Arani Bose, New York
Joe Ray (b. 1944, Alexandria, Louisiana)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)

Blue Spade, 1993
Acrylic on canvas, cotton fabric, and vinyl record disk

US, 1993
Acrylic on canvas and cotton fabric

The Super Continent, 1993
Acrylic on canvas, cotton fabric, and wood box with objects, glass top

Courtesy of the artist
Will Ryman (b. 1969, New York, New York)
City Park

Icon, 2011
Painted stainless steel, Nida-Core, fiberglass, and paint
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

Will Ryman’s participation is made possible, in part, with support from New Orleans City Park.
Analia Saban (b. 1980, Buenos Aires, Argentina)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (first floor)

Composition with Readymade Paint (from House Mouldings), 2014
Found moldings, peeled molding paint, and wax crayon on linen canvas

Composition with Readymade Paint (from Door), 2014
Found door and peeled door paint on linen canvas

Composition on Three-Pane Broken Window, 2014
White molding with stretched canvas

Composition with Readymade Paint (from 8ft. House Moulding), 2014
Found molding and peeled molding beam paint on linen canvas

Marking (from Bathroom Sink), 2014
Found bathroom sink and ground sink pigment on linen canvas

Composition on Six-Pane Broken Window, 2014
Wax crayon and linen on six-pane window with broken glass

Chair Cushion with Protruding Upholstery Springs, 2014
Linen canvas on found seat cushion with inner upholstery springs on walnut shelf

Courtesy of the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York
Lisa Sigal (b. 1962, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

Home Court Crawl, 2014
Archival digital prints with mixed media on Tyvek
Courtesy of the artist, © Suzan-Lori Parks

Home Court Crawl, 2014
Broadsheets
Courtesy of the artist, © Suzan-Lori Parks
Special thanks to Suzan-Lori Parks, and her “365 Days/ 365 Plays”, 2002
Lisa Sigal’s participation has been made possible, in part, by Creative Capital.
Gary Simmons (b. 1964, New York, New York)
Tremé Market Branch

Recapturing Memories of the Black Ark, 2014
Plywood inlaid epoxy floor and PA speakers
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York; Anthony Meier, San Francisco; Simon Lee, London; and Regen Projects, Los Angeles

This project has been made possible, in part, by the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation.
Herbert Singleton (b. 1945 - 2007)
The Ogden Museum of Southern Art (fifth floor, Outsider Gallery)

Angola, n.d. (1990s)
Painted wood bas relief
Collection of Gordon W. Bailey, Los Angeles

Come Out of Her, n.d.
Painted wood bas relief
Collection of Gordon W. Bailey, Los Angeles

Dr. Kilikey, n.d.
Painted wood bas relief
Collection of Gordon W. Bailey, Los Angeles

Heaven Help Us of All, n.d.
Painted wood bas relief
Collection of Gordon W. Bailey, Los Angeles

Leander Perez, 1992
Enamel paint on wood
Collection of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Gift of the Roger H. Ogden Collection

Raspberry Man, 1992
Enamel paint on wood
Collection of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Gift of the Roger H. Ogden Collection

Boyfriend, 1992
Enamel paint on wood
Collection of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Gift of the Roger H. Ogden Collection

Strawberry Woman, 1992
Enamel paint on wood
Collection of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Gift of the Roger H. Ogden Collection
Lucien Smith (b. 1989, Los Angeles, California)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (first floor)

Ark (History of the Earth), 2013
Silkscreen on canvas

Mene, Mene, Tekel Upharsin, 2013
Oil on canvas

Courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York
Tavares Strachan
BAHAMAS
The Mississippi River and The Exchange Gallery

You Belong Here, 2014
Blocked out neon
Courtesy of the artist 

Production: David Meinhart, Joseph Vincent Gray, Michael Hall, Chris Hoover, Speed Levitch, Erica Sellers, Bob Snead, and Christophe Thompson. 

Tavares Strachan’s participation has been made possible, in part, by The Ed Bradley Family Foundation; Canal Barge Company, Inc.; Chris & Wayne at Prosigns LLC; Magnolia Fleet LLC; Safway LLC; Press Street; and Flatland.
Agus Suwage (b. 1959, Java, Indonesia)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (third floor)

Tolerance #1, 2012
Oil, acrylic, and bitumen on canvas

Tolerance #2, 2012
Oil, acrylic, and bitumen on canvas

Tembok Toleransi #2, 2013
Tin cans and car audio systems

Courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York
Alma Thomas (1891- 1978)
USA
New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) (Modern & Contemporary Galleries)

Azaleas in Spring, 1968
Oil on canvas
Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York

Carnival of Autumn Leaves, 1973
Oil on canvas
Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York

Dogwood Display II, 1972
Acrylic on canvas
The New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of Elizabeth R. French
Antonio Vega Macotela (b. 1980, Mexico City, Mexico)
Longue Vue houses & Gardens

Selections from the series Time Divisa, 2006-2010
Mixed media
Courtesy of the artist and LABOR, Mexico City
Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953, Portland, Oregon)
The George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art

Into the Abyss, 2003
Pigment ink print

Untitled (billboard), 2003
Pigment ink print

Untitled (Path to the Manor), 2003
Gelatin silver print

Sorrow's Bed, 2003
Iris print

At the Precipice, 2003
Gelatin silver print

Passage Way l 2003
Gelatin silver print

Passage Way ll, 2003
Gelatin silver print

Looking Forward, 2003
Gelatin silver print

Looking Back, 2003
Gelatin silver print

Untitled (Standing on the Tracks), 2003
Gelatin silver print

Untitled (industrial Tanks), 2003
Gelatin silver print

Untitled (Cemetary), 2003
Gelatin silver print

The Louisiana Project was commissioned by the Newcomb Art Gallery at Tulane University to commemorate the bicentennial anniveray of the Louisiana Purchase.

Missing Links Sheep, 2003
Iris print

Missing Links Chicken, 2003
Iris Print

Lincoln, Lonnie and Me - A Story in 5 parts, 2012
Video installation and mixed media

Lincoln, Lonnie and Me was commissioned for the exhibition Feminism and..., curated by Hilary Robinson, Ph.D., in 2012 for the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Meaning and Landscape, 2003
DVD
Duration: 14 minutes

©CARRIE MAE WEEMS. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Entang Wiharso (b. 1967, Java, Indonesia)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (first floor)

I Don't Want to Be a Hero, 2013
Aluminum, resin, color pigment, and thread

Double Happiness #1 - Memorial Landscape, 2013
Aluminum, thread, resin, and color pigment

Double Happiness #2, 2013
Aluminum caste

Courtesy of the artist and MARC STRAUS, New York
David Zink Yi (b. 1973, Lima, Peru)
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (second floor)

Horror Vacui, 2009
Two-channel HD video installation
Duration: 120 minutes
Courtesy of the artist; Johann König, Berlin; and Hauser & Wirth, Zürich, London, New York

 

 

P.3+

As part of its mission to support the local arts community, Prospect New Orleans has implemented a Satellite Program for each biennial edition. This program is directed at highlighting and promoting concurrent exhibitions and arts events put on by local artists during the opening weekend and throughout the course of the biennial.

 During the thirteen weeks of Prospect.3, the New Orleans art community will showcase approximately 70 contemporary art exhibitions, projects and events across the city. Organized by artists, arts organizations, co-ops, curators, and advocates, P.3+ will feature the work of approximately 300 emerging and established New Orleans and regional artists.

Please contact Grace Rennie, P.3+ Coordinator, at info@prospectneworleans.org if you have any questions.

P.3+ Participants

All Venues open October 25, 2014 – January 25, 2015 unless otherwise noted

Click here  to see the full exhibition listings with contact information and exhibition descriptions
  • @DIVINE COMMUNITY ALTER Group exhibition of installation work and collaborative design
    • 1228 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.
    • at-divine.tumblr.com
    • Sat-Thurs 10am-3pm, Fri 10am-7pm and by appointment
  • A.I.R. Pioneers: Portraits by Judy Cooper Solo Exhibition
  • Above Canal: The Creative Alliance of New Orleans (CANO)'s Creative Spaces in Central City Group exhibition, "Rights and Revival," at the Myrtle Bank Building, 3rd Floor. Sponsored in part by Alembic Community Development, the City of New Orleans, and the New Orleans Tourism and Marketing Corporation
    • 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.
    • www.cano-la.org
    • Thursday - Sunday, 11am -4pm, special events and by appointment
  • American Alligator Automobile Sculptural Installation by Christopher Smith
    • The Warehouse Grille, 869 Magazine St.
    • Daily, Dusk until Midnight
  •  Atemporal Macramé (Kitschy Kitschy Cuckoo) Group Exhibition and Potluck events presented by
    • 723 Louisa Street Digest, 723 Louisa St.
    • Mondays, 10am-12pm, coffee served
  • BAMBOULA / NOLA Group sound exhibit and panel discussions based on Tulane's campus, with a satellite space in the Marigny
    • 7001 Freret, satellite space at 2402 Royal St
    • bamboulanola.tumblr.com
    • Main Fri-Sun, 12-6pm
    • Satellite Tues-Fri 10am-6pm, Sat 12-6pm, Sun 12-5pm
  • Barrister's Gallery Group and solo Exhibitions
  • Below Canal : CANO's Creative Space at St. Maurice Church in Holy Cross in Lower 9th Ward, "Reverberations," Performances and exhibitions by New Orleans Airlift; Monique Moss and Dancers; David Sullivan and Kent Wood, visual works. Sponsored in part by Blake Jones, the City of New Orleans and the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation
    • St. Maurice Church, 605 St. Maurice Ave
    • www.cano-la.org
    • Friday -Sunday, 11am -4pm, special events and by appointment
    • Contact: gaspard@cano-la.org
  • Blank Canvas Solo exhibition for opening weekend and outdoor installation
    • 526 Caffin Ave.
    • Opening Weekend Fri-Sun 12-4pm
    • Installation on view 24/7
  • Crevasse 22: "Surge," Pop Up Sculpture Garden presented by CANO Creative Alliance of New Orleans, sponsored by Torres-Burnes Trust, Sidney D. Torres III and Roberta Burns
    • 8122 Saro Lane, Poydras, LA
    • www.cano-la.org
    • Friday -Sunday, 11am- 4pm, special events and by appointment
    • Contact: gaspard@cano-la.org
  • Cry Me A River Group exhibition featuring work by Simmons & Burke, Zoe Crosher, Jen DeNike, Todd Gray, Tanya Haden, Janet Levy, Rachael Neubauer, Ariana Papademetropoulos, Alia Penner, Fay Ray, Jim Shaw, Penny Slinger, Lola Rose Thompson
    • Open 10/25-12/12 
  • D R E A M T H R O A T One night only video installation
  • Exhibit BE Collaborative graffiti installation
    • The De Gaulle Manor Community Apartments, 3010 Sandra Dr.
    • For opening times please visit www.exhibitbe.com
  • Faster, With More Knowledge New work by Brian St. Cyr
  • Five in Four Photography exhibition at Rabbit Ears
    • Rabbit Ears, 8225 Oak St.
    • Tues. – Sat., 12-6pm
  • Foodways Group exhibition presented by Pelican Bomb
  • For When Goblins Sit Down Panacea Theriac and Milagros Collective
  • Guns in The Hands of Artists Group exhibition
  • I Am Not Garbage Mike Kilgore solo exhibition
  • In Empathy We Trust Photography exhibition by E2
  • La Oruga y La Mariposa Film Screening and Q&A
    • Café Istanbul, 2372 St. Claude
    • 11/10; 6-8 PM
  • Le Adoración de MAXIMON One night only performance by David Ford
  • Linked Mural by Sally Heller
  • MAGDALENA Group exhibition interpreting Mary Magdalene
  • Messiahs of Vulgarity- The After Party One night only group exhibition and party
    • 225 N. Peters St 4th floor
    • 10/25, 9:30pm-1am
  • Mexican Consulate Gallery Solo exhibitions
    • 901 Convention Center Blvd. Suite 118
    • 10/2-10/30 and 11/6-11/30 Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm
  • MirrorFugue: Reflections of New Orleans Pianists featuring Allen Toussaint, Jon Cleary, Ron Markham and Nick Sanders. Installation presented by Xiao Xiao 
    • Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St.
    • 12/10 – 12/20, Tues. – Sat., 9:30am-4:30pm
    • www.xiaosquared.com Twitter: @xiaosquared
  • MotherShip II: Dreaming of a Future Past and MotherShip III: The Station Installations by Dawn DeDeaux
    • MotherShip II: Thursday- Sunday 2pm-5pm. Closed for holidays; 11/27, 11/28, 12/24, 12/25, 12/31 and 1/1
    • MotherShip III: Thurs-Sun 12-5pm. Closed for holidays
  • P.3+ at the Parlor Group exhibition
  • Peep This! Group exhibition
    • L9 Center for the Arts
    • L9artscenter.org
    • Wed. – Sun., 11am-5pm
  • Press Street's Antenna Gallery Group exhibitions
  • Public Practice Performance by Delaney Martin and Claire Tancons for New Orleans Airlift
    • The Embassy, 1342 Franklin Ave
    • 10/25, 3-5PM – One Night Only
  • Reckon Mural by Jack Niven
  • REPARATION: Contemporary Artists from New Orleans- Exhibition of small paintings by New Orleans based artists curated by Diego Cortez
    • NOMA, 1 Collins Diboll Circle
    • noma.org
    • Tues. – Sun., Tues- Thurs 10-6pm, Fri 10-9pm, Sat and Sun 11-5pm
  • Shotgun Cinema at the Marigny Opera House Film series
  • Show and Tell Group exhibition
    • Gallery Inferno 6601 St Claude Ave.
    • Mon-Sat 10am-4pm
  • Space Rites Installation by Taylor Shepherd and events presented by New Orleans Airlift
    • Opening Performance: Sunday Oct 26th, 7pm
    • CANO’s Below Canal, 605 St. Maurice Ave
    • www.neworleansairlift.org
    • Fri - Sun., 12pm-5pm
  • TEN Gallery Group and solo exhibitions
  • Terratour Collabortive installation
  • The Art House on the Levee: "Cone of Uncertainty," and Community Plan for Holy Cross School Site, exhibitions presented by artist/planner Robbert Tannen in association with Bob Lempert and the Lower 9th Ward Community
    • 4725 Dauphine St
    • Holy Cross, Lower 9th Ward
    • www.robertctannen.com
    • Friday -Saturday, 11am -4pm, special events, and by appointment
    • Contact: rtannen@cox.net
  • The Embassy Gun buyback and recording studio presented by Kirsha Kaechele and The Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania
    • 1342 Franklin Ave
    • www.cash4guns.org
    • Email for more information: info@cash4guns.org
    • Buyback Oct 25th, 1200 Franklin Ave 9-6pm
    • Opening Ceremony Oct 25th, 1342 Franklin Ave 12pm
  • The Eumenides Lala Rascic solo exhibition
    • UNO Campus Fine Art Gallery, 2000 Lakeshore Dr.
    • 11/3 – 12/3, 8:30am-4pm
  • The Front Group and solo exhibitions
    • 4100 St Claude Ave
    • nolafront.org
    • Sat. and Sun., 12-5pm and by appointment, and sat openings 6-9pm
  • The Goddess Revisited, Willendorf to Trucker Mudflaps Collaborative mural presented by Angela King
    • 826 Gravier St.
    • Daily, 24 hours
  • The Nature of Now Group exhibition curated by Pamala Bishop
    • 3308 Magazine Street
    • Saturdays 10am-2pm and by appointment
  • The Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition presented by The Helis Foundation Public sculpture
  • Treo Group and solo Exhibitions
  • Tulane Contemporary.3 Group exhibition of tenured and tenure track faculty
  • United Bakery Gallery and Annexes Group exhibitions and events
    • 1325-1337 St. Bernard Ave
    • Sat and Sun, Gallery-1-5pm, Annexes 12-6pm
  • With Light, With Love Group exhibition
    • The Tigermen Den 3113 Royal St.
    • www.thetigermenden.com
    • Saturdays, 1-5pm

As part of its mission to support the neighboring communities, Prospect New Orleans has implemented a satellite program, P.3+ Regional, which includes the cities of Hammond, LA; Baton Rouge, LA, Lafayette, LA and Mobile, AL. The program is directed at highlighting and promoting concurrent exhibitions and arts events in these cities throughout the course of the biennial. This outreach to neighboring communities takes advantage of the rich cultural resources of these cities and places their activities in dialogue with the local, national and international artists participating in Prospect.3: Notes for Now.

Prospect New Orleans will be offering Art Excursions via bus to the P.3+ Regional sites in Hammond on January 10, 2015. Details are included below.

HAMMOND
Hammond Regional Art Center
217 East Thomas Street
Hammond, LA  70401
985 542 7113
www.hammondarts.org

 


Hammond Art Excursion Bus Trip to view P.3+ Regional programming in Hammond
Saturday, January 10, 2015

Presenting over two dozen art exhibits, installations and performances through Janaury 25, 2015. Exhibits include: "Flight of the Wetlands" by John Valentino; a performance by GIANTS IN THE CITY, a traveling exhibit of giant inflatable art sculptures created by an international group of artists; an exhibit by Jeff Mickey & Jean Flint; a P.3+ Regional Juried Show; "Perfectly Imperfect" by Mike Kilgore; ACRE TV video installation; and exhibits by Lori Gomez, Shanna D'Antonio,  Josh Hailey, Kim Bergeron, Heather Vallaire, Michel Schroeder, Rachel Brown and Leah Anne Floyd,  Christina Molina, Courtney Keller, Gustavo Duque; Kenneth Alexander, Lester Merriweather, Chuck Wright, Patty McGehee, Roland Guidry, and Andrea Hano.

$45, includes bus trip to and from Hammond, a reception at the Hammond Regional Art Center, and visits to performances, exhibits and programs.

The bus leaves New Orleans at 11AM from the Contemporary Art Center, 900 Camp Street, and returns to New Orleans at approximately 7:30PM.

For more information, or to reserve a spot on the bus, contact caroline@prospectneworleans.org

Visit http://www.hammondarts.org for more information and to download a brochure with a complete schedule.

Throughout the duration of Prospect 3, Hammond will present the following art exhibits, live music, performing arts, special events and 1st Friday Art Walks. 

-Changing monthly exhibits and lectures at Hammond Regional Arts Center.

-Regular exhibits and an extensive collection of mural paintings at the Tangipahoa African American Heritage Museum and its downtown pop-up annex.

-Public art installation by Gustavo Duque.

-"Flight of the Wetlands" by John Valentino.

-"Giants in the City" public art installation, January 9 - 11.

-"Feast of Flowers" community art installation.

-Changing monthly exhibits and lectures at SELU Contemporary Art Gallery.

-Rotating exhibits by members of the Hammond Art Guild.

-Streaming video installation presented by ACRE TV.

-Multi-Sensory audio-visual installation by Savej.

-Regular exhibits at Oak St. Gallery.

-Artwork by Lloyd Wilson, Drake Fuller and Dead Girl Art at A Little Bit of Dis & Dat.

-"Indecent Exposure" group exhibit.

-Public art exhibits by Andrea Hano and Pat Macaluso and Chuck Wright, Phillip Colwart and  Tyler Vance

-Changing exhibits by Christina Molina, Shanna D'Antonio, Kim Bergeron, Drake Fuller, Lloyd  Wilson, Dead Girl Art and Heather Vallaire.

-Regular local live music at various downtown venues and music, dance and theater at  the Columbia Theater.

 

BATON ROUGE
The Walls Project Art & Design Center
451 Florida Boulevard, Suite 102
Baton Rouge, LA 70801
www.thewallsproject.org

More info at:
www.elevatorprojects.com

 

P.3+Baton Rouge: Notes Upriver will present dozens of new installations, exhibitions, film screenings, and live events at over 15 locations throughout the capital region.Emerging arts organization Elevator Projects with support from the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, The Walls Project, and Red Cake Event Planning are
coordinating projects for P.3+BR. The program will include locally made film screenings at the Manship Theatre, documentary film screenings at Lagniappe Records, literary program in partnership with New Delta Review, and a weekend of special arts events from November 14 to 16.

Perhaps the most ambitious element of Notes Upriver is the occupation of an entire vacant floor of the downtown Chase Towers, in an effort to fill the space with local contemporary art. The 15,000 square foot temporary alternate gallery space in the South Tower will feature works by over 60 Baton Rouge artists and will be open to the public during select hours and by appointment.

Dozens of local partners sites will also present exhibitions, artist lectures, literary readings, and performances. P.3+Baton Rouge locations include

The Baton Rouge Gallery Center for Contemporary Art
Shaw Center for the Arts
LSU Museum of Art
Louisiana Art & Science Museum
Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge Firehouse Gallery
LSU School of Art Foster Gallery and Glassell Gallery
Ann Connelly Fine Art
Manship Theatre
The Healthcare Gallery
Lagniappe Records
Capital Park Welcome Center
The Walls Project Art & Design Center
The Gallery at Manship Theatre

On Saturday, November 15, the Walls Project Art & Design Center, located on the ground floor of the Chase Towers, will host 12 hours of cultural performances including collaborative dance, digital orchestras, environmental mixed-media installations, and local music starting at noon. Free entrance to all partnering museums and galleries from 12pm- 5pm.

Two special events will take place on Saturday, November 15th as part of the LSU Museum of Art's participation in P.3+: from 3-4 p.m. an exhibition tour with artist Kelli Scott Kelley of her work Accalia and the Swamp Monster and from 4-5 p.m. an unveiling of the latest installation from local emerging artist Silas Breaux as part of the Love Local Art contest. More information on these events can be found here: http://prospectneworleans.squarespace.com/storage/LSU%20MOA_pressreleases.pdf

Sunday, November 16, the Manship Theatre will host a local filmmaker’s festival, celebrating films produced in Louisiana.

The closing reception for P.3+BR will be the January 24 Surreal Salon Soiree at the Baton Rouge Gallery. The Soiree is a unique Baton Rouge experience with live music, surrealist games, interactive installations, and hundreds of bizarrely clad attendees coming together to celebrate the Capital Region's partnership with Prospect New Orleans and the completion of Notes Upriver.

P.3+BR: Notes Upriver programming has been made possible by the support of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, Heather Sewell-Day and David Wright of Redcake Event Planning, Florida Street Holdings, Rodneyna Hart, Diane Leightman and Stinson Maps, Ann Connelly Fine Art, Elizabeth Weinstein and the Louisiana Art & Science Museum, Natasha Walker, Elisabeth Altazan, Matthew Schwartz of Pacifico, The Walls Project, Tiffany Sewell, Melisa Rad, Jason Langlois and the Manship Theatre, Emily Pontiff, Jency Hogan, Jonathan Downing, Maya Curtis, Jessica Sharpe, Chad Forbes, and many wonderful, dedicated volunteers.
For more information about upcoming exhibitions and events, go to
http://www.elevatorprojects.com

LAFAYETTE
Acadiana Center for the Arts
101 West Vermilion Street
Lafayette, LA  70501
337 233 7060

http://acadianacenterforthearts.org


Over the course of Prospect.3, our partner organization the Acadiana Center for the Arts will host two exhibitions, “Eco Displacement:Ghosts of the Gulf” and “Trivial Pursuit: Obsession’s Allure.  Located in Lafayette, LA, the ACA is a quick two-hour drive from New Orleans and well worth the trip. 

Eco-Displacement:  Ghosts of the Gulf
Brandon Ballengée

October 11 – January 25
Opening reception October 11, 6-9pm

The ACA is pleased to host Brandon Ballengée’s  Eco-Displacement: Ghosts of the Gulf.   This ambitious project will be comprised of a 16 foot aquarium which will function as a free-standing eco-system with dozens of aquatic native Mississippi Basin plants and animals collected with the public and students on field-trips. The Mississippi River is the largest river system in North America and is home to thousands of species of native plants and animals. From the phytoplankton that helps to create the air we breathe, to the fish and shellfish that we eat, we’re connected to the river.   It is in hopes that through this project people will recognize that the river is not separate from their daily lives but is integral to the interconnected communities along the shoreline and the surrounding region.

Trivial Pursuits: Obsession’s Allure

October 11 – January 25
Opening reception October 11, 6-9pm

Many artists currently working today fixate on or around an image, idea, passion or even a dilemma.  From this fixation there comes an endless amount of information often within very narrow perimeters that inform or guides art making.  This fixation can be a powerful force, often a consuming passion that leads to an obsession. In this exhibition of over 15 artist, themes, processes or concepts are taken to a notable extreme. Artists include; Susan Bowers, Ralph Bourque, Troy Dugas, Fred Daspit, Shawne Major, Aaron McNamee, James A. Meaux, Mary Morgan, Stephanie Patton, Mark Ponder, Sam Reveles, Brian St. Cyr, Regina Scully, Alfred J. “AJ” Stahl, and Eric Todd.

 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

Centre for the Living Arts
301 Conti Street

Mobile, AL 36602

251 208 5671

www.centreforthelivingarts.com

 Over the course of Prospect.3, our partner organization the Centre for the Living Arts will present,”Pre-Glo”, on view through December 31st, 2014.  Located approximately two hours from New Orleans in Mobile, AL, the Centre for the Living Arts is not to be missed.

PRE-GLO
April 11 – December 31, 2014

Pre-Glo is generously sponsored by Wind Creek Hospitality and Mrs. Arlene Mitchell.

The Main Gallery will feature Mario Ybarra, Jr.’s billboards from The Manifest Destiny Billboard Project, organized by LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division)The Manifest Destiny Billboard Project is a series of artist-produced billboards and activations that will unfold along Interstate 10 Freeway from Florida to California through spring 2015. Using approximately 100 billboards total, 10 artists will create “chapter” groupings along I-10, each a unique interpretive link to the exhibition’s thematic. The billboards will move through and punctuate the landscape by tracing territorial expansion from east to west, along one of the country’s busiest freeways, and will conclude in Los Angeles.

Ybarra Jr. is a visual and performance artist, educator and activist who combines street culture with fine art to produce site-specific urban interventions that often bring to light little-known aspects of a particular location’s cultural history.  Ybarra Jr.’s chapter of The Manifest Destiny Billboard Project uses source material from the artist’s ongoing collection of images of what he calls “barrio aesthetics” in Los Angeles. Ybarra Jr. is interested in inserting the daily culture and experience of one city and neighborhood into another, both contrasting and familiar. Ybarra’s billboards, which have been on display in both Mobile and Baldwin counties since January 2014, will be exhibited in PRE-GLO.

The Video Gallery features Global Futures: Pre-Glo, curated by Tom Leeser of the Center for Integrated Media at CalArts. This installation of sound and video blends the Centre’s upcoming theme of globalism with its previous video exhibit, Future Tense – Futures 
Project. The two themes intersect at the point of representation, a “global futurism” seen through a lens of technological driven data visualizations and the ever-expanding reach of global communication.

This communication is evidenced by the data visualizations from the Spatial Information Design Lab at Columbia University and its director, Laura Kurgan. For the exhibit, video selections of the Lab’s work are projected onto the Centre’s video gallery walls. The video is accompanied by wall text that describes each project.  Click here for more information on Spatial Information Design Lab.

The Lab’s complex and compelling data visualizations are contrasted with sound art from four international artists who use electronic music, spoken word and field recordings gathered from around the world. Stephanie Smith recorded the haunting and mysterious sounds of a ship at sea. Tom Leeser captured the sound of Nepalis and Tibetans performing chants while doing “kora,” a daily walking ritual done around the Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu. Kristín Pora Haraldsdotti’s exhibits her rare collection of recorded Icelandic folk poems, and Henry Schroy contributed a Brazilian drumming performance from Rio de Janeiro. Each of the sound artists and their recordings are positioned in the gallery as “cardinal points”- describing the compass positions of east, west, north and south.

Global Futures: Pre-Glo is immersive, yet it provides enough space for the viewer to experience a critical distance addressing the paradox of scale within the current global condition. The Spatial Information Design Lab’s projections appear as a visual example of the enormity of publicly gathered global data, while the sound art is heard individually through headphones as an isolated and private refuge.

Global Futures: Pre-Glo participants include:

Video, Data Visualizations and Website:
Spatial Information Design Lab, Columbia University
Laura Kurgen, Director

Sound Artists:

Kristín Pora Haraldsdottir
Henry Schroy
Stephanie Cheng Smith
Tom Leeser

Curator/Artist:

Tom Leeser

Video Editing/ Media Supervision:

Raphael Arar

Lounge

Ongoing

Xavier de Richemont’s immersive light installation, Pop Boat, which was created for Futures Project, will remain on view for the duration of PRE-GLO.

2×4, New York City design consultancy, will be responsible for exhibition design and identity for both PRE-GLO and GLOBAL. With the launch of The Memory Project in 2012, CLA partnered with 2×4 to implement an extensive organizational re-brand, featuring a re-designed website and style guide. Clients include Prada, Nike, Dia Art Foundation, the Guggenheim Museum, Museum of the Modern Art, the New York Times and the Whitney Museum, as well as numerous others nationwide and abroad.

 

Join the P.3 Team!

Prospect.3: Notes for Now is seeking volunteers throughout the run of the biennial. We appreciate your participation and know that this will be an exciting and fun way to contribute to the city of New Orleans.  

For more information, email info@prospectneworleans.org. 

The Prospect New Orleans Volunteer Manual can be found here.

You can also check out which volunteer opportunities are already available by visiting our page on VolunteerSpot!

Click to View Volunteer Opportunities on VolunteerSpot


Traveling by Train?


Prospect.3 attendees will be offered a 20% discount if traveling by Amtrak! Click here to make a reservation: http://www.amtrak.com/prospect

Ride with Uber to Prospect.3!

We are partnering with Uber New Orleans to offer a FREE Uber rides up to $20 to Prospect 3 attendees. To redeem, download the app, enter the promo code: PROSPECT3W, and request a ride! Download the Uber app at: t.uber.com/prospect3w

What is Uber?

Uber is a mobile app that connects riders to drivers, providing the safest and most reliable rides on the road. Uber offers riders a truly magical experience: simply press a button and a car will show up and take you where you need to go.

Spread the Uber love! Tell us how awesome your Uber ride was by tagging @Prospect_NOLA and @Uber_NOLA.

Want more Uber? Visit the Uber New Orleans blog. Follow @UBER_NOLA
Terms & Conditions: This promotion is valid for new Uber users only. Offer valid until 1/25/14. Offer not valid on uberTAXI.

 

Rental Cars

An economical and independent way to go.  Parking near the venues ranges from easy to modestly challenging---no major anguish.  Use our provided map & guide to map out your venue visits.

Taxis

Taxi service in New Orleans is quite uneven and can be frustrating.  It's easy to get a cab from a hotel in the city center or a street in the French Quarter.  Once outside the epicenter, you have to call them.  Wait times vary from a few minutes to more than 30.

We are pleased to partner with Royal Insider, our Official Inbound Travel Operator, to offer custom, arrival-to-departure itineraries at all levels for groups traveling to New Orleans to experience the biennial during opening weekend and throughout the run. All arrangements are woven together into a seamless trip, including hotel accommodations, ground transport, restaurants, outings to experience the Prospect.3 installations hosted by curators and artists, and outings and events to afford otherwise inaccessible experiences of the authentic culture of New Orleans.

Royal Insider is a "culture-sustaining" travel company based in New Orleans that plans and orchestrates trips allowing guests to participate in the authentic culture of a destination, hosted by the people whose strivings sound out the heartbeat of that culture every day. By doing so, they afford guests otherwise inaccessible experiences, while channeling visitor resources to support people and entities vital to the culture—rather than feeding a caricature-heavy tourism infrastructure detached from the soul of the place.

We hope that you will consider attending Prospect. 3 for the Opening Weekend events (October 23-25) or at some point during the 13-week run of the biennial. We look forward to welcoming you!

Visit Royal Insider at http://p3.royalinsider.com

BICYCLE TOURS

Prospect New Orleans is partnering with Bike Easy to offer visitors and locals the opportunity to experience P.3 by Bicycle. Tours will take place on Sundays from October 25, 2014 until January 24, 2015, and on VIP preview days, October 23 and 24.

Bike Easy is a local bike advocacy organization whose mission it is to make bicycle riding in New Orleans easy, safe and fun. 

WHEN
VIP preview days: October 23 and 24
Sundays: Oct 25, 2014 – Jan 25, 2015
11:00am-4:00pm

WHERE

All tours begin at Confederacy of Cruisers, 634 Elysian Fields Ave, and explore P.3 Venues throughout the City.

COST

$80 per person – Includes tour, museum admission, and $25 bicycle rental
$55 per person – Includes tour and museum admission (provide your own bike)

DETAILS

Bike Easy is excited to be partnering with Prospect.3 New Orleans to present P.3 Rides – an opportunity for visitors and locals to experience P.3 by bicycle! With so many exhibitions and events taking place concurrently, P.3 Rides will simplify the process of engaging in P.3’s offerings.

Our tour will take you to P.3 venue highlights throughout the Faubourgs, New Orleans’ historic neighborhoods, and will include background information on the Prospect.3: Notes for Now biennial.

Tours last 4-5 hours, with the majority of the time spent viewing venues. We will also provide a stop for lunch at a local eatery.

For more information and to make a reservation, please visit http://bikeeasy.org/projects/p.3-rides-prospect-3-bike-tours/

Book your tour today!

Booking a P.3 Rides tour is simple:

  • First, fill out your contact information and select the tour date at http://bikeeasy.org/projects/p.3-rides-prospect-3-bike-tours/
  • Once we receive your booking form, we will follow up shortly with a Paypal link for you to pay for the tour and complete your reservation. Once you receive a Paypal confirmation via email, your tour is reserved! Please note that the tour is not reserved until payment is received.

Please note that booking for weekend tours closes at 12pm on the Friday prior to that tour. If you are interested in booking after 12pm on a Friday for this weekend’s tours, please call us at 504-400-5468 or 504-565-8497. We can only accept a limited number of walkups, so please call us for availability to ensure that we can accommodate you!

FAQs
Information about tour confirmation, refunds, and cancellations:

  • There will be no tours offered December 20/21 and 27/28 due to a holiday hiatus.
  • We need a minimum of 2 riders to offer a tour. If you are the only registered rider, we will let you know at the time of registration that the tour is pending and notify you immediately when the tour is confirmed. If we do not have 2 riders to offer a tour, we will offer a 100% refund and notify you by Friday at noon prior to the tour.
  • If you book a tour and need to reschedule, let us know by Friday at noon before your tour and we’ll reschedule for no added cost. If you need to cancel a tour reservation, let us know by Friday at noon and we will give you a 100% refund. If you let us know on Friday by 10pm, we can refund for 50% of the tour cost. If you miss a tour without notifying us, we are unable to provide a refund.
  • In the case that a tour needs to be cancelled due to inclement weather, we will notify you at noon the day before the tour. In cases where we cancel a tour, we will, of course, provide you with a 100% refund.
  • We do accept walk-up tours, provided that there is space on the tour. However, we strongly encourage you to pre-register to ensure a spot on the tour. Call us for tour availability if it is after 12pm on a Friday at 504-400-5468 or 504-565-8497.

Group Tours
If you are interested in booking a tour for a group of 7 or more, please contact anneka@bikeeasy.org to learn more about group logistics and rates.

 

PEDICAB TOURS

P.3 has partnered with Bike Taxis Unlimited to provide tours of some of the Prospect.3: Notes for Now venues. The following tours are offered for  $45 per hour and can be customized upon request. Regular trips to venues will be offered at the standard rate of $1 per minute or $60 per hour.

Tour #1: Central City/Downtown/9th Ward (approximately 3.5-4 hours)

  • George and Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art
  • Ashé Cultural Arts CenterExchange Gallery
  • Joan Mitchell Center Studios
  • New Orleans African American Museum
  • Treme Market Branch
  • May Gallery & Residency
  • UNO St. Claude Gallery

 Tour #2: Downtown/French Quarter (approximately 2-3 hours)

  • Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans
  • Ogden Museum of Southern Art
  • AIA New Orleans (1000 St. Charles)
  • Esplanade Ave Wharf (viewable from the Moon Walk directly across from Jackson Square)

Tour #3: City Park Area & Uptown (2-3 hours)

  • New Orleans Museum of Art
  • City Park
  • Dillard University
  • Isaac Delgado Art Gallery, Delgado College
  • Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University    

Call 504.891.3441 for information about tours and to book a reservation.